gms | German Medical Science

GMS Health Technology Assessment

Deutsche Agentur für Health Technology Assessment (DAHTA)

ISSN 1861-8863

Minimally invasive surgical procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

Minimal-invasive Verfahren zur Behandlung des Bandscheibenvorfalls

HTA-Bericht

  • corresponding author Dagmar Lühmann - Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Institut für Sozialmedizin, Lübeck, Deutschland
  • author Tatjana Burkhardt-Hammer - Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Institut für Sozialmedizin, Lübeck, Deutschland
  • author Cathleen Borowski - Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Institut für Sozialmedizin, Lübeck, Deutschland
  • author Heiner Raspe - Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Institut für Sozialmedizin, Lübeck, Deutschland

GMS Health Technol Assess 2005;1:Doc07

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.egms.de/en/journals/hta/2005-1/hta000007.shtml

Published: November 15, 2005

© 2005 Lühmann et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.

The complete HTA Report in German language can be found online at: http://portal.dimdi.de/de/hta/hta_berichte/hta108_bericht_de.pdf


Abstract

Introduction

In up to 30% of patients undergoing lumbar disc surgery for herniated or protruded discs outcomes are judged unfavourable. Over the last decades this problem has stimulated the development of a number of minimally-invasive operative procedures. The aim is to relieve pressure from compromised nerve roots by mechanically removing, dissolving or evaporating disc material while leaving bony structures and surrounding tissues as intact as possible. In Germany, there is hardly any utilisation data for these new procedures – data files from the statutory health insurances demonstrate that about 5% of all lumbar disc surgeries are performed using minimally-invasive techniques. Their real proportion is thought to be much higher because many procedures are offered by private hospitals and surgeries and are paid by private health insurers or patients themselves. So far no comprehensive assessment comparing efficacy, safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery to standard procedures (microdiscectomy, open discectomy) which could serve as a basis for coverage decisions, has been published in Germany.

Objective

Against this background the aim of the following assessment is:

  • Based on published scientific literature assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery compared to standard procedures.
  • To identify and critically appraise studies comparing costs and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures to that of standard procedures.
  • If necessary identify research and evaluation needs and point out regulative needs within the German health care system. The assessment focusses on procedures that are used in elective lumbar disc surgery as alternative treatment options to microdiscectomy or open discectomy. Chemonucleolysis, percutaneous manual discectomy, automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, laserdiscectomy and endoscopic procedures accessing the disc by a posterolateral or posterior approach are included.
Methods

In order to assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures as well as their economic implications systematic reviews of the literature are performed. A comprehensive search strategy is composed to search 23 electronic databases, among them MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Methodological quality of systematic reviews, HTA reports and primary research is assessed using checklists of the German Scientific Working Group for Health Technology Assessment. Quality and transparency of cost analyses are documented using the quality and transparency catalogues of the working group. Study results are summarised in a qualitative manner. Due to the limited number and the low methodological quality of the studies it is not possible to conduct metaanalyses. In addition to the results of controlled trials results of recent case series are introduced and discussed.

Results

The evidence-base to assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery procedures is rather limited:

  • Percutaneous manual discectomy: Six case series (four after 1998)
  • Automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy: Two RCT (one discontinued), twelve case series (one after 1998)
  • Chemonucleolysis: Five RCT, five non-randomised controlled trials, eleven case series
  • Percutaneous laserdiscectomy: One non-randomised controlled trial, 13 case series (eight after 1998)
  • Endoscopic procedures: Three RCT, 21 case series (17 after 1998)

There are two economic analyses each retrieved for chemonucleolysis and automated percutaneous discectomy as well as one cost-minimisation analysis comparing costs of an endoscopic procedure to costs for open discectomy.
Among all minimally-invasive procedures chemonucleolysis is the only of which efficacy may be judged on the basis of results from high quality randomised controlled trials (RCT). Study results suggest that the procedure maybe (cost)effectively used as an intermediate therapeutical option between conservative and operative management of small lumbar disc herniations or protrusions causing sciatica. Two RCT comparing transforaminal endoscopic procedures with microdiscectomy in patients with sciatica and small non-sequestered disc herniations show comparable short and medium term overall success rates. Concerning speed of recovery and return to work a trend towards more favourable results for the endoscopic procedures is noted. It is doubtful though, whether these results from the eleven and five years old studies are still valid for the more advanced procedures used today. The only RCT comparing the results of automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy to those of microdiscectomy showed clearly superior results of microdiscectomy. Furthermore, success rates of automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy reported in the RCT (29%) differ extremely from success rates reported in case series (between 56% and 92%).
The literature search retrieves no controlled trials to assess efficacy and/or effectiveness of laser-discectomy, percutaneous manual discectomy or endoscopic procedures using a posterior approach in comparison to the standard procedures. Results from recent case series permit no assessment of efficacy, especially not in comparison to standard procedures. Due to highly selected patients, modi-fications of operative procedures, highly specialised surgical units and poorly standardised outcome assessment results of case series are highly variable, their generalisability is low.
The results of the five economical analyses are, due to conceptual and methodological problems, of no value for decision-making in the context of the German health care system.

Discussion

Aside from low methodological study quality three conceptual problems complicate the interpretation of results.

1.
Continuous further development of technologies leads to a diversity of procedures in use which prohibits generalisation of study results. However, diversity is noted not only for minimally-invasive procedures but also for the standard techniques against which the new developments are to be compared.
2.
The second problem refers to the heterogeneity of study populations. For most studies one common inclusion criterion was "persisting sciatica after a course of conservative treatment of variable duration". Differences among study populations are noted concerning results of imaging studies. Even within every group of minimally-invasive procedure, studies define their own in- and exclusion criteria which differ concerning degree of dislocation and sequestration of disc material.
3.
There is the non-standardised assessment of outcomes which are performed postoperatively after variable periods of time. Most studies report results in a dichotomous way as success or failure while the classification of a result is performed using a variety of different assessment instruments or procedures. Very often the global subjective judgement of results by patients or surgeons is reported. There are no scientific discussions whether these judgements are generalisable or comparable, especially among studies that are conducted under differing socio-cultural conditions. Taking into account the weak evidence-base for efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures it is not surprising that so far there are no dependable economic analyses.
Conclusions

Conclusions that can be drawn from the results of the present assessment refer in detail to the specified minimally-invasive procedures of lumbar disc surgery but they may also be considered exemplary for other fields where optimisation of results is attempted by technological development and widening of indications (e.g. total hip replacement).

1.
Compared to standard technologies (open discectomy, microdiscectomy) and with the exception of chemonucleolysis, the developmental status of all other minimally-invasive procedures assessed must be termed experimental. To date there is no dependable evidence-base to recommend their use in routine clinical practice.
2.
To create such a dependable evidence-base further research in two directions is needed:
a) The studies need to include adequate patient populations, use realistic controls (e.g. standard operative procedures or continued conservative care) and use standardised measurements of meaningful outcomes after adequate periods of time.
b) Studies that are able to report effectiveness of the procedures under everyday practice conditions and furthermore have the potential to detect rare adverse effects are needed. In Sweden this type of data is yielded by national quality registries. On the one hand their data are used for quality improvement measures and on the other hand they allow comprehensive scientific evaluations.
3.
Since the year of 2000 a continuous rise in utilisation of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery is observed among statutory health insurers. Examples from other areas of innovative surgical technologies (e.g. robot assisted total hip replacement) indicate that the rise will probably continue - especially because there are no legal barriers to hinder introduction of innovative treatments into routine hospital care. Upon request by payers or providers the "Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss" may assess a treatments benefit, its necessity and cost-effectiveness as a prerequisite for coverage by the statutory health insurance. In the case of minimally-invasive disc surgery it would be advisable to examine the legal framework for covering procedures only if they are provided under evaluation conditions. While in Germany coverage under evaluation conditions is established practice in ambulatory health care only (“Modellvorhaben") examples from other European countries (Great Britain, Switzerland) demonstrate that it is also feasible for hospital based interventions. In order to assure patient protection and at the same time not hinder the further development of new and promising technologies provision under evaluation conditions could also be realised in the private health care market - although in this sector coverage is not by law linked to benefit, necessity and cost-effectiveness of an intervention.

Zusammenfassung

Einleitung

Vor dem Hintergrund von bis zu 30% unbefriedigender Ergebnisse nach operativen Behandlungen des Bandscheibenvorfalls wird in den letzten Jahrzehnten eine Vielzahl von minimal-invasiven Behandlungsverfahren entwickelt. Mit ihrer Hilfe soll unter weitestgehender Gewebeschonung durch Entfernung, Auflösung oder Verdampfung von Bandscheibengewebe eine Druckentlastung der betroffenen Nervenwurzeln erreicht werden.
Über die Häufigkeit ihres Einsatzes in Deutschland können kaum Aussagen gemacht werden - Daten aus dem Bereich der gesetzlichen Krankenversicherungen (GKV) zufolge machen minimal-invasive Eingriffe derzeit etwa einen Anteil von 5% (2003) an allen Bandscheibenoperationen aus. Der wirkliche Anteil ist allerdings höher einzuschätzen, da viele der Verfahren von privaten Leistungsanbietern angeboten und von privaten (Zusatz)versicherungen bzw. von Selbstzahlern finanziert werden.
Bisher ist in Deutschland noch keine umfassende Bewertung der Wirksamkeit, der Sicherheit und der ökonomischen Konsequenzen der minimal-vasiven Bandscheibenoperationsverfahren im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren vorgenommen worden, die als Basis für Kostenübernahmeentscheidungen dienen könnte.

Fragestellung

Vor diesem Hintergrund soll der vorliegende Bericht:

  • Anhand der publizierten Literatur eine Bewertung der Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit der einzelnen minimal-invasiven Verfahren im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren vornehmen.
  • Die Identifizierung und Bewertung der Literatur zur Kosteneffektivität der einzelnen minimal-invasiven Verfahren im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren unternehmen.
  • Gegebenenfalls Forschungs- und Evaluationsbedarf sowie Handlungsbedarf im Versorgungssystem aufzeigen.

Es werden ausschließlich Verfahren betrachtet, die unter elektiver Indikationsstellung alternativ zur mikrochirurgischen Diskektomie bei der Behandlung des lumbalen Bandscheibenvorfalls eingesetzt werden. Hierzu gehören: die Chemonukleolyse, die perkutane manuelle und die perkutane automatisierte Diskusdekompression, die Laserdiskusdekompressionen sowie endoskopisch unterstützte Verfahren mit posterolateralem bzw. posteriorem Zugang zur Bandscheibe.

Methodik

Die Bewertung der Wirksamkeit und der Sicherheit der minimal-invasiven Methoden im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren sowie deren gesundheitsökonomische Implikationen erfolgen in systematischen Literaturübersichten. Hierzu wird eine breit angelegte Recherche in 23 elektronischen Literaturdatenbanken vorgenommen. Die methodische Qualität sowie die Transparenz von Übersichtsarbeiten, HTA-Berichten und RCT, mithilfe der Checklisten der German Scientific Working Group for Health Care Health Technology Assessment (GSWG-HTA) überprüft und bei den gesundheitsökonomischen Studien mit den entsprechenden Katalogen der Arbeitsgruppe dokumentiert. Die Zusammenfassung der Ergebnisse erfolgt qualitativ beschreibend. Quantitative Informationssynthesen (Metaanalysen) können auf der Grundlage des vorliegenden Datenmaterials nicht vorgenommen werden. Neben Resultaten kontrollierter Studien werden auch Ergebnisse aktueller Fallserien vorgestellt und ihr Stellenwert diskutiert.

Ergebnisse

Die Evidenzbasis für die Bewertung der Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit der Verfahren stellt sich wie folgt dar:

  • Perkutane manuelle Diskusdekompression: Sechs Fallserien (vier nach 1998)
  • Perkutane automatisierte Diskusdekompression: Zwei RCT (eine abgebrochen), 12 Fallserien (eine nach 1998)
  • Chemonukleolyse: Fünf RCT, fünf kontrollierte Studien, elf Fallserien
  • Perkutane Lasernukleotomie: Eine kontrollierte Studie, 13 Fallserien (acht nach 1998)
  • Endoskopische Verfahren: Drei RCT, eine kontrollierte Studie, 21 Fallserien (17 nach 1998).

Für die Chemonukleolyse und die perkutane automatisierte Diskusdekompression liegen je zwei gesundheitsökonomische Analysen vor, außerdem eine Kostenminimierungsanalyse für ein endoskopisches Verfahren.
Die Chemonukleolyse ist das einzige Verfahren, dessen Wirksamkeit und dessen Sicherheit sich im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren auf der Grundlage valider Studiendaten beurteilen lassen. Die Literaturanalyse legt die Bedeutung des Verfahrens als intermediäre Therapieoption zwischen konservativer und operativer Behandlung nahe. Für endoskopisch unterstützte Eingriffe werden in zwei RCT dem Standardverfahren vergleichbare kurz- und mittelfristige Erfolgsraten gefunden, hinsichtlich sozialmedizinischer Outcomes sind die Ergebnisse tendenziell sogar günstiger. Allerdings ist fraglich, ob die in den elf und fünf Jahre alten Studien erzielten Ergebnisse angesichts der permanenten Weiterentwicklung der Verfahren sowie der zu beobachtenden Indikationsausweitung im derzeitigen Versorgungskontext noch Gültigkeit haben. Die Resultate der automatisierten perkutanen lumbalen Diskektomie (APLD) sind in der einzigen auswertbaren RCT denen des Standardeingriffs weit unterlegen und kontrastierten stark zu denen aus Fallserien.
Zur Beurteilung der Wirksamkeit und der Sicherheit von Laserverfahren, von manuellen perkutanen Diskektomien sowie von endoskopisch unterstützten Eingriffen mit posteriorem Zugang zur Bandscheibe im Vergleich zu den Standardverfahren liegen keine Informationen aus kontrollierten Studien vor. Die Ergebnisse von Fallserien sind für eine verallgemeinerbare oder vergleichende Bewertung der Wirksamkeit von Behandlungsverfahren wenig hilfreich. Selektierte Patientenklientel, Modifikationen der eingesetzten Verfahren, Spezialisierung von Behandlungszentren sowie wenig standardisierte Ergebnismessungen bedingen eine hohe Streubreite der Resultate und verhindern Vergleiche.
Die Ergebnisse der gesundheitsökonomischen Analysen liefern aufgrund methodischer und inhaltlicher Probleme keine im bundesdeutschen Versorgungskontext verwertbaren Informationen.

Diskussion

Neben studienmethodischen Aspekten erschweren drei inhaltliche Problemkomplexe die Interpretation der verfügbaren Informationen:

1.
Die ständige Weiterentwicklung der Technologien führt zu einer Methodenvielfalt, die übergreifende Aussagen für eine Verfahrensgruppe verhindert. Dabei betrifft die Vielfalt nicht nur die minimal-invasiven Verfahren, sondern auch die Standardtechnologie, gegen deren Ergebnisse der Wirksamkeitsvergleich stattfinden soll.
2.
Das zweite Problem betrifft die Heterogenität der Patientenklientel in den einzelnen Studien. Durchgängiges Einschlusskriterium für alle Arbeiten ist das Persistieren von ischialgieformen Beschwerden nach einer unterschiedlich langen Phase ergebnisloser konservativer Behandlung. Unterschiede werden bei der Befundbewertung durch bildgebende Verfahren deutlich. Innerhalb jeder Verfahrensgruppe werden anhand der bildgebenden Befunde unterschiedliche Ein- und Ausschlusskriterien formuliert, die sich vor allem hinsichtlich des Dislokationsgrads des Bandscheibenvorfalls und des Vorhandenseins von Sequestern unterscheiden.
3.
Beim dritten Aspekt handelt es sich um die wenig standardisierte Erhebung der Outcomes in den einzelnen Studien, die außerdem noch in variablen Abständen zum Eingriff stattfindet. Die in den Studien zu minimal-invasiven Eingriffen häufig verwendete dichotome Beurteilung Erfolg vs. Misserfolg beruht ihrerseits auf einer Vielzahl von unterschiedlichen Erfassungsinstrumenten und Prozeduren, von denen viele die subjektive Einschätzung des Operationsergebnisses durch den Patienten oder Operateur zugrunde legen. Übertrag- und Vergleichbarkeit dieser Bewertungen, vor allem wenn sie in unterschiedlichen kulturellen Kontexten erhoben weren, sind schwer einzuordnen.

Auf der wenig belastbaren Datenbasis zur vergleichenden Wirksamkeit der Verfahren können bisher keine aussagekräftigen gesundheitsökonomischen Untersuchungen unternommen werden.

Schlussfolgerungen

Die Schlussfolgerungen, die aus den Ergebnissen der vorliegenden Bewertung gezogen werden müssen, sind in ihren Einzelheiten spezifisch für die bewerteten Verfahren(sgruppen), haben aber auch exemplarischen Charakter für andere Praxisfelder, in denen Ergebnisoptimierung durch technologische Weiterentwicklung und Indikationsaufweitung versucht wird (vergl. z.B. Hüftgelenkendoprothetik).

1.
Im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff ist, mit Ausnahme der Chemonukleolyse, der Status aller übrigen im Rahmen der vorliegenden Beurteilung bewerteten Verfahren als fortdauernd experimentell einzustufen. Eine belastbare Datengrundlage, die eine Einsatzempfehlung für die Verfahren in der Routineversorgung rechtfertigt, existiert derzeit nicht.
2.
Die belastbare Datengrundlage lässt sich nur durch weitere Forschung schaffen. Dabei werden zwei Arten von Informationen benötigt:
a) Valide Daten zur Beurteilung der Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit (als Grundlage für die Nutzenbewertung) der minimal-invasiven Verfahren im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff bzw. im Vergleich zu konservativen Therapieoptionen. Sie sind nur durch RCT an adäquat ausgewählten Patientengruppen, unter realistischen Kontrollbedingungen, über einen adäquaten Zeitraum und mit validen Zielgrößen zu erhalten.
b) Informationen, die den Nutzen der Verfahren unter Alltagsbedingungen belegen und darüber hinaus das Potential haben, unerwartete Risiken zu entdecken. In Skandinavien hat sich hierzu das Führen von Qualitätsregistern bewährt. Sie können einerseits als Qualitätsförderungsinstrument genutzt werden und andererseits Daten für wissenschaftliche Auswertungen liefern.
3.
Im Bereich der GKV ist seit 2000 ein kontinuierlicher Anstieg der Anwendungshäufigkeit minimal-invasiver bandscheibenchirurgischer Eingriffen zu beobachten. Beispiele anderer innovativer Operationsverfahren (z.B. roboter-unterstützte Hüftgelenkimplantation) lassen vermuten, dass sich dieser Trend fortsetzen wird, vor allem auch vor dem Hintergrund, dass für die Einführung neuer Behandungsverfahren im Krankenhaus kein gesetzlicher Erlaubnisvorbehalt existiert. Als Voraussetzung für eine Kostenübernahme durch die GKV besteht, angesichts der unklaren Evidenzlage, die Möglichkeit, durch den Bundesausschuss prüfen zu lassen, inwieweit Nutzen, Notwendigkeit und Wirtschaftlichkeit der genannten Verfahren den Anforderungen entsprechen. Dabei sollen vor allem auch die gesetzlichen Möglichkeiten zur Zulassung einer Leistung unter adäquaten Evaluationsbedingungen geprüft werden (nach dem Beispiel der Modellvorhaben im ambulanten Bereich). Als Beispiele aus dem europäischen Ausland können hierzu die Zulassungsmodalitäten in Großbritannien oder in der Schweiz dienen. Gleiches wäre im Prinzip auch für den Bereich der privaten Krankenversicherung (PKV) bzw. für die Erbringung der Leistungen als äIndividuelle Gesundheitsleistung zu fordern, wobei für diese Bereiche allerdings keine gesetzliche Bindung der Kostenerstattung (vergleichbar mit dem Sozialgesetzbuch Fünf (SGB V) an nachgewiesenen Nutzen, Notwendigkeit und Wirtschaftlichkeit existiert.

Executive Summary

1. Introduction

Back pain with or without sciatic symptoms (leg pain) is a very common disorder. Lifetime prevalence in western industrialised countries amounts up to 80% [35]. In about 5% of all patients with acute back pain lumbar disc herniation is thought to be causing the symptoms [1]. It is assumed that protruded disc material compromises spinal nerve roots and causes irritation. Irritation leads to pain and in some cases to neurological deficits. Surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation aims to be causal. Protruded disc material is mechanically removed, chemically dissolved or evaporated in order to take pressure from compromised nerve roots. There is a clear indication for surgical treatment when irreversible neurological damage is to be expected (as in the case of Cauda-Equina-Syndrome, or rapidly progressing pareses) or when severe pain is not controlled by conservative measures. However, less than 5% of patients with clinically manifested disc herniation develop these dramatic symptoms. In most cases there is only a relative indication for surgical treatment, if there is one at all.

Prospects of success, necessity and economic consequences of elective lumbar disc surgery have been debated controversially over the last decades - against the background that in most cases the natural course of the disease is lengthy and painful but benign in the end while surgery leads to high rates (up to 30%) of unfavourable results.

Ongoing research is focussing the problem from two perspectives. One stream of research activities is trying to identify patient characteristics that determine the success of surgical results in order to refine indication criteria. So far a few risk factors for unfavourable results have been identified: back pain as a lead symptom, psychological symptoms overlaying physical symptoms, discrepancies between clinical and radiological signs, compensation payments. Newer evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of disc herniation incorporate these findings by recommending very careful selection of patients for surgery [25].

The other stream of research activities aims at optimising surgical procedures by minimising surgical trauma. Instability and scar formation resulting from tissue and bone traumatisation are thought to be the main cause of unfavourable postoperative results. This development led to microdiskectomy overcoming open diskectomy as the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation.

Furthermore, a variety of procedures have been developed which differ from each other by the way the herniated disc is accessed, the way visualisation of the operative site is achieved and the way pressure is taken off the nerve roots.

Searching for procedures used for surgical but elective treatment of lumbar disc herniation as an alternative to standard surgery (microdiskectomy), six groups of interventions within two categories may be identified:

  • Percutaneous procedures: chemonucleolysis, percutaneous manual disc decompression, automated percutaneous lumbar disc decompression, percutaneous laser disc decompression or -diskectomy and nucleoplasty.
  • Endoscopic procedures with posterolateral or posterior access to the lumbar disc space (incl. Endoscopic laserforaminoplasty (ELF) and percutaneous endoscopic laser disc decompression).

There are hardly any utilisation data for minimally invasive lumbar disc surgery in Germany. According to statutory health insurance data minimally-invasive procedures were performed in about 5% of all lumbar disc surgery cases in 2003. An increase in frequency is noted since 2000. Their real proportion is thought to be much higher - many procedures are offered by private hospitals while costs are covered by private health insurers or patients themselves.

So far no comprehensive assessment (which could serve as a basis for coverage decisions) of efficacy, safety and economic consequences of minimal invasive lumbar disc surgery compared to standard procedures has been undertaken in Germany.

2. Objective

Against this background the aims of the following asessment are:

  • Assessment of efficacy and safety of minimally invasive lumbar disc surgery in comparison to standard surgery, based on the published scientific literature.
  • Identification and assessment of cost-effectiveness literature comparing minimally invasive and standard procedures.
  • Identification of research, evaluation and regulatory needs within the German health care system.

As more than 95% of disc surgery is performed at the lumbar spine, the present report will exclusively focus on this location. Excluded from the assessment are:

  • Procedures that are clearly in the experimental state of development (e.g. Hydrojetnucleotomy).
  • Procedures that are used for different indications as the standard procedure (e.g. Disc Prostheses, Catheter Treatments, IDET = Intradiscal Electrothermal Annuloplasty).
  • Procedures for which no scientific literature could be retrieved during the preparation of the assessment (nucleoplasty).

3. Assessment of medical efficacy, effectiveness and safety

3.1 Methods

A systematic review of the literature was compiled for the assessment of efficacy, effectiveness and safety. In a comprehensive literature search 23 electronic databases were screened using search terms that covered the following topics: "disc herniation", "minimally invasive surgical procedures", "therapeutic studies" and "economic analyses". Due to the continuous further development of surgical procedures our search only covered the last five years of publication (January 1998 until December 2003) and was updated once in summer 2004. The first selection of possibly relevant papers was performed by screening titles and abstracts of publications for methodological as well as content related in- and exclusion criteria. The second selection round was based on full text, applying the same criteria:

  • Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials comparing the results of minimally invasive lumbar disc surgery (chemonucleolysis, percutaneous manual disc decompression, automated percutaneous lumbar disc decompression, percutaneous laser disc decompression or diskectomy, endoscopic procedures with posterolateral or posterior access) with those of microdiskectomy or open diskectomy.
  • HTA reports and systematic reviews of the study types mentioned above.
  • Adult patient clientele with first time operations in one level.
  • Excluded were studies in very specific patient groups (e.g. competitive athletes, patients with rheumatoid arthritis).
  • Secondary inclusion criterion: Case series of minimally invasive procedures (after search for controlled trials yielded very little information).

Methodological study quality was documented using the checklists of the German Scientific Working Group for Technology Assessment in Health Care (GSWG-TAHC). Study results were summarised in a qualitative manner for each group of minimally invasive procedures. Due to the limited number and the low methodological quality of the studies it was not possible to conduct meta-analyses.

3.2 Results

The literature searches yielded 1,328 publications of which eleven fulfilled the primary inclusion criteria (five systematic reviews, three HTA reports and three RTC: Table 1 [Tab. 1]).

The methodical quality of the review papers is very heterogeneous. The systematic reviews of Gibson at al. [13], Lühmann et al. [25], Boult et al. [4] and the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) [30], [31] as well as the RCT fulfilled most of the quality criteria of the GSWG-TAHC. The review of Schmid [37] is from a methodological point of view not corresponding to scientific standards; the overview of Rasmussen et al. [34] is lacking the transparent documentation of searches and critical appraisal of primary literature. Knight et al. [20] compare data from very heterogeneous sources (previously published RCT, own registry data). Except for Gibson et al. [13] and Rasmussen et al. [34] whose work is based upon the results of RCT only, all other authors take into account reviews and HTA reports as well as data from non-randomised controlled trials and case series.

In addition all case series published between 1998 and 2003 and reporting results of the specified minimally invasive procedures were extracted from the search results and examined. Taken together, the evidence base for the assessment of efficacy, effectiveness and safety looks as follows:

  • Percutaneous manual nucleotomy: Six case series (four published after 1998)
  • Automated percutaneous diskectomy: Two RCT (one terminated), twelve case series (one published after 1998)
  • Chemonucleolysis: Five RCT, five non-randomised controlled trials, eleven case series
  • Percutaneous lasernucleotomy: One controlled trial, 13 case series (eight published after 1998)
  • Endoscopic procedures: Three RCT (two published after 1998), one controlled trial, 21 case series (17 published after 1998)

Three case series reporting results of nucleoplasty were not available.

Upon this evidence-based assessment of efficacy, effectiveness and safety of minimally invasive procedures yielded the following results:

Percutaneous manual nucleotomy

For this group of procedures there are no data from controlled trials available. Six case series with an average observation time of one year report success rates between 52% and 94% while outcomes have been measured using heterogeneous instruments (modified MacNab Criteria; JOA Score; non-standardised reporting of reduction of back and leg pain). Recurrence of symptoms was noted in 4,5% to 19% of the operated patients. Data from case series indicate that technical (amount of disc material removed, method of visualisation) as well as patient dependent characteristics (size and location of prolapse) determine success rates. In most case series the method was used to treat small herniation not protruding the posterior ligament.

Due to heterogeneity of patients, outcome measures used and technical variation of treatment methods these results cannot be generalised to the whole group of percutaneous manual nucleotomies, especially not in comparison to standard procedures.

Automated Percutaneous Lumbar Diskectomy (APLD)

There are two RCT comparing the efficacy of APLD to the efficacy of microdiskectomy or open conventional diskectomy. Both trials include patients with small disc herniations or protrusions suffering from sciatic symptoms resistant to conservative treatment. Both studies had to be terminated ahead of time. The RCT of Chatterjee et al. [5] was terminated after inclusion of 71 patients (aiming for 160 patients) when interim analyses after six months showed significantly worse result for patients treated with APLD (MacNab: 29% success for APLD vs. 82% success for microdiskectomy, p<0.001). The second RCT performed by Haines et al. [14] aimed to compare the efficacy of automated (APD) and endoscopic percutaneous diskectomy (EPD) to the efficacy of conventional diskectomy: It was terminated early because of recruitment problems (instead of 330 patients only 34 were included). There were no statistically significant differences in success rates (Mac Nab) among the groups at six months. Authors explain the recruitment problem by the fact that only a small fraction of patients with lumbar disc herniation qualify for APLD if generally accepted indication criteria (e.g. Criteria of the Food and Drug Association) are used.

Success rates between 56% and 92% as reported in twelve case series are rather contrasting to the RCT results.

In conclusion it may be stated that the efficacy of APLD is probably inferior to that of microdiskectomy. Furthermore our results demonstrate that data from case series do not contribute to a valid comparison of efficacy of different procedures.

Percutaneous Lasernucleotomy/Laser Disk decompression

One trial reports inferior results for patients (sciatica; monosegmental, non-sequestrated, non-extruded herniated disc) treated with lasernucleotomy in comparison to historical controls treated with open diskectomy (65% excellent and good results versus 85% excellent and good results) [3].

13 case series report varying success rates between 56.5% and 91.5%. There is considerable heterogeneity among the studies concerning technical details of procedures, observation time and methods of outcome assessment. Most patients included suffer from sciatica with radiologically confirmed protrusions or disc herniations not protruding ligaments. In most trials a period of unsuccessful conservative treatment preceded the intervention.

Taken together it must be stated that there is no valid evidence-base to draw conclusions on the efficacy or effectiveness of lasernucleotomy procedures in comparison to standard techniques.

The British institute NICE recommends the intervention to be used within the National Health System only under trial- and audit conditions and with the obligation of informing patients about the lack of efficacy data.

Chemonucleolysis

Among all minimally invasive procedures the assessment of efficacy and effectiveness of chemonucleolysis compared to microdiskectomy or open diskectomy is the only one that is based on RCT data. Five RCT [6], [9], [4], [29], [42] include patients with symptoms of root compression, radiologically confirmed disc protrusion and a period of unsuccessful conservative treatment. Observation times vary between one and two years. Outcomes assessed are: necessity for a second operation; success as judged by the operating surgeon; success as judged by the patient and success judged by an independent observer. In the Cochrane Review [13] results of the studies were compiled by metaanalysis. These results demonstrate inferior results for chemonucleolysis when compared to open diskectomy (higher rates of failure after twelve months; higher probability for re-operation after six to 24 months).

In the same Cochrane Review furthermore five studies were analysed comparing chemonucleolysis to placebo treatment (+ continued conservative therapy) [7], [10], [11], [17], [39]. The studies of high methodologically quality demonstrate superior results of chemonucleolysis compared to continuing conservative care (rated by patients, surgeons or independent observer). The authors of the Cochrane Review are concluding that chemonucleolysis might be an intermediate treatment option between conservative and surgical care. These conclusions are supported by the study results of van Alphen et al. [42] who found identical success rates when comparing chemonucleolysis with optional diskectomy versus diskectomy alone (patient rated outcomes).

Chymopapain is at the moment not available in German pharmacies.

Endoscopically assisted minimally invasive disc surgery

So far, three RCT examined the efficacy of endoscopic procedures compared to microdiskectomy, including the terminated study by Haines et al. [14] whose results cannot be used.

One RCT [28] includes 40 (20 per study group) patients with sciatic symptoms (including slight neurological deficits) resistant to conservative treatment and radiologically proven small subligamental herniations. Due to the small number of patients no statistically significant differences in success between the treatment groups could be made. There was a tendency noted towards a quicker postoperative improvement in the endoscopic group, which were most profound looking at return to work rates. On the other hand three out of 20 endoscopically treated patients had to undergo a second operation, in the group treated with microdiskectomy only one out of 20 needed a second procedure.

Another RCT [15] includes 60 patients (30 per study subgroup) with root symptoms and radiologically proven lumbar intracanalicular disc protrusions. While clinical results (success rates, satisfaction with the operation results) were identical there were some advantages for the endoscopically treated patients noted concerning postoperative recovery.

Both studies used a posterolateral or transforaminal access to the disc space for the endoscopic procedures.

Schmid [37] compiled the results of two case series and one non-randomised controlled study to assess the efficacy of endoscopically assisted lumbar disc surgery. In these studies satisfactory results were noted in 72% to 91% of treated patients [19], [23], [38]. The compilation does not take into account technical heterogeneity of the procedures used.

Between 1998 and 2004, 14 case series were published, especially reflecting the permanent further development of operating techniques and the widening of indication criteria. This reduces the comparability of study results. In nine studies with endoscopic procedures using posterolateral and transforaminal access to the disc space success rates between 69% and 90% are reported. Five studies reporting on endoscopic procedures using access to the disc space from posterior find success rates between 90.5% and 94%. Patients with all types of disc protrusion or - herniation were in included in the studies.

Percutaneous Endoscopic Laserdiskectomy (PELD) which uses a combination of endoscopic and laser technique is taking a special position among the endoscopic treatments. Its efficacy compared to standard techniques could not yet be proven in controlled studies. Four case series and time comparisons report success rates between 60% and 87%.

The ELF (Endoscopic Laser Foraminoplasty) which was originally developed to treat stenoses of the lateral recesses is also taking a special position. There are no efficacy data from controlled trials yet, data from published case series (all originating from one operating centre) indicate success rates around 70%.

In conclusion it may be stated that endoscopically assisted minimally invasive procedures constitute a group of medical technologies with a lot of ongoing further development and research. For these procedures two RCT comparing results to standard operations are available. They do not find significant differences concerning efficacy (success rates), but point out a tendency towads faster postoperative recovery. The results are referring to patients with small and subligamental disc protrusions. The results of case series including patients with non-covered, dislocated and/or sequestered protrusions suggest high success rates for this indication as well. Still, results from case series are hardly generisable.

Based on the data available, no conclusion can be drawn concerning the efficacy of ELF or PELD in comparison to standard procedures.

Safety

Compiling data on the safety of the minimal invasive procedures compared to standard procedures is even more difficult than the comparison of their efficacy. In most trials the assessment of complications is less standardised than the assessment of surgical outcomes - in most cases it is a purely anecdotal description of single adverse events. Due to the rarity of events studies with a low number of participants are not suitable for analysing complication rates from a statistical point of view. The careful interpretation of trial results indicates that complication rates of minimal invasive treatments are at least not higher than those of standard procedures.

3.3 Discussion
Amount and quality of available evidence, transferability of results

There is a far-reaching consensus among researchers and policy makers that assessment of efficacy of a treatment should be based on the results of high quality controlled trials, preferably RCT. The proof of efficacy is a necessary component for the assessment of benefit which incorporates further qualities such as safety or access and further perspectives such as patients, clinicians, payers or society's view.

Only nine randomised trials on three of the six groups of technologies assessed here are available, their results being partly compromised by methodological difficulties. Methodological problems include low patient numbers, insufficient description of randomisation techniques, unblinded and non-standardised assessment of outcomes as well as short observational times.

Five RCT assess the efficacy of chemonucleolysis compared to standard surgical techniques. In Germany this procedure is currently not performed at all, due to the unavailability of chymopapain. Three RCT focus the efficacy of endoscopic procedures compared to open surgery. One RCT is reporting non-clinical outcomes only [36]. The results of the two remaining RCT are hardly comparable due to technical differences among the surgical procedures used (interventional - as well as comparison techniques), the outcomes assessed and time of observation. For the Automated Percutaneous Lumbar Diskectomy (APLD) results of one RCT are available [5]. This trial had to be terminated early due to highly inferior results of APLD compared to the standard technique. A second RCT [14] investigating APLD was terminated due to recruitment difficulties. There are no RCT available for manual percutaneous nucleotomy or lased diskectomy.

All other data on the efficacy of minimally invasive lumbar disc surgery derive from case series. Even within the procedure groups the studies demonstrate great heterogeneity concerning included patient groups, the technical specifications of procedures, the setting, the outcomes assessed, the duration and the completeness of observations. Under optimal conditions (clearly specified procedure, adequate indication, documented additional treatment, objective and standardised assessing of outcomes, almost complete follow-up observation) a statement about the efficacy and or safety of a specific procedure in that highly specific situation can be made. Conclusions for the entire group of technologies may not be based on the results of case series.

When it comes to transferring international research results into the context of the German health care systems, national specificities are not as important as three content related problems which make a comparison of study results and their interpretation difficult:

  • Ongoing further development of technologies leads to a variety of methods "on the market" which prohibits giving recommendations concerning a whole group of technologies. This variety is not only noted among the minimally invasive procedures but also among the standard surgical techniques against whose results the new procedures are to be compared.
  • The second problem is concerned with the heterogeneity of patients included in trials and case series. One inclusion criterion applied in almost all studies is the persistence of sciatic symptoms despite conservative treatment. Differences are noted when taking into consideration results of radiological investigations. Even within the groups of technologies differing inclusion and exclusion criteria are used concerning radiological findings (e.g. dislocation or size of herniations, sequestration or penetration of ligaments).
  • The third problem is concerned with the lack of standardisation in outcome assessment which is furthermore performed in variable intervals after the operations. The most frequently used dichotomous judgement of success and failure is based upon a variety of different assessment instruments and procedures. Among those many rely on the subjective judgement of results by the surgeon himself or the patient (MacNab Criteria in various modifications). Validity and generisabilitiy of these measurements especially in settings with different social-cultural background has never been systematically reviewed.

In 1999 in their conclusion of the Cochrane Review Gibson et al. [13] point out the need for methodologically rigorous RCT in order to assess the efficacy of minimally invasive disc surgery compared to standard techniques. This conclusion is shared by the authors of all the literature reviews [4], [25], [30], [31], [34] analysed in this volume.

Efficacy

From a methodological point of view the most valid information is available for the assessment of the efficacy of chemonucleolysis. RCT results suggest that considering chemonucleolysis as an intermediate treatment option between conservative and surgical yields results as favourable as standard diskectomy alone. However, chemonucleolysis is rarely performed in Germany (and also in the USA). The main reason for this is, beside the pharmaceutical not being available in Germany, that severe allergic and severe neurological complications (severe infections) are feared [37], [40]. Taking into consideration published data on complication rates, this fear is hard to substantiate. Reanalysis of all chemonucleolysis trials of the Cochrane Review [20] and two large post-marketing studies (USA 1984: 29,057 cases; Europe 1987: 18,925 cases) report complication rates. According to their results less than 2% of treated patients experience allergic reactions, the rate of anaphylactic reactions with circulatory problems is not even 1%. Deaths due to anaphylactic complications were reported in 0.07% of cases in the American data and in the European trials not at all.

The second group with RCT data on efficacy compared to standard techniques are the endoscopically assisted procedures. It has to be noted though that this group comprises a number of very heterogeneous surgical techniques. The two RCT available [28], [15] demonstrate comparable success rates for endoscopic procedures and standard technology. As concerns return to daily routines and work a trend towards faster recovery was observed for the endoscopic procedures. These conclusions refer to techniques using a posterolateral access to the disc space in patients with a small, non-sequestered disc protrusion. Furthermore, it is not clear whether these results from ten year old trials are generisable to procedures used now.

All further information on clinical efficacy and safety of endoscopic procedures are based on the results of case series. In these studies the great variety of endoscopic procedures performed as well as the heterogeneity of the patients included prevents an overall conclusion for the whole group of technologies. A certain time related tendency can be observed though: whereas older studies (published before 2000) are performing minimal invasive treatments on patients with small and covered protrusions, more recent studies also include patients with large, dislocated or sequestered protrusions. Success rates for the minimally invasive procedures (assessed by heterogeneous assessment tools) do not differ very much from those reported for standard procedures.

The interpretation of data on the safety of minimally procedures is even more difficult. While for measuring success some standardisation is at least tried by using scales like the Mac Nab Criteria, the measurement of adverse reactions or events is totally unstandardised. Most reporting is unsystematic and anecdotal. A differentiation of complications according to severity and specificity for the procedure assessed is hardly applied. The frequency of severe complications (injury of the dura/durafistula, nerval root injury) reported in case series of endoscopic procedures is markedly less than 5% and therefore ranges in the same order of magnitude as for standard procedures [16].

Assessment of the (comparative) efficacy of APLD is mainly based on the results of one RCT which demonstrates markedly inferior results for APLD (29% primary successes) as compared to microdiskectomy (80% primary successes). These results are contrasting to the results reported case series which vary between 56% and 92%. Various explanations for these observation have been discussed (age and state of hydration of the protrusion; form of the protrusion: wide vs. narrow based; preceding treatments) without leading to clarification. Against this background two conclusions may be drawn:

  • APLD does not seem to be an appropriate treatment alternative for patients with small lumbar disc herniations.
  • Results of case series are not a valid base for conclusions on the efficacy of treatments, especially not in comparison to alternative options.

There are no data from controlled trials for the assessment of the efficacy of percutaneous manual diskectomy in comparison to the standard procedures. Six case series (three published after 1998) report variable success rates between 52% and 94%. Some of the result indicate that success might depend on anatomical characteristics of the disc protrusion (prolapse vs. protrusion) and technical specifications of the procedures used (e.g. amount of disc tissue removed). Nevertheless these are only observations from single studies which cannot form the base for an overall conclusion on the efficacy of this group of technologies. There are hardly any data on safety available so no overall conclusion can be drawn.

For the assessment of efficacy of percutaneous lasernucleotomy there are no data from controlled trials either. Case series results do not permit conclusions on the significance of these procedures among the treatment options for lumbar herniated discs. Like the endoscopic procedures the group of laser procedures comprises a number heterogeneous technologies. Different lasers are used in different doses with different instruments of application, with the help of different visualisation techniques and on different settings (radiological departments vs. microsurgery or orthopaedics, out-patient vs. in-patient). Very low complication rates (<1% discitis) are reported in three cases series.

Effectiveness

There are five sources for information for effectiveness of medical treatments: so called controlled "pragmatic" trials, observational studies with population or regional reference, systematic observations of utilisation, surveillance data and registry data.

There are no such data (to date) on the effectiveness of minimally invasive lumbar disc surgery procedures. For chemonucleolysis older surveillance studies [32] are yielding information on frequency and type of complications, but not on effectiveness. The Swedish registry for disc surgery collects data on all surgical procedures performed on the spine, completeness ranges around 85%. Aim of the registration is to improve effectiveness, efficiency and quality of spinal surgery. Individual patient data on diagnosis, treatment performed and outcome (one and two years after the operation) is registered, analysed and fed back to the operating departments. For this volume the annual report of 2003 (based upon 2002 data) of the Swedish registry was made available. So far no specific analyses on minimally invasive procedures have been performed but will be available in the coming years as it was communicated by the head of the registry.

To date it must be concluded that the question of whether minimally invasive surgical procedures to treat lumbar disc herniation are effective cannot be answered on the basis of the published literature.

Research needs

The use of minimally invasive surgical treatment as an alternative to microdiskectomy or open diskectomy is characterised by a paradoxical situation: on the one hand there is a large amount of procedures being heavily advertised and marketed and on the other hand, there are hardly any data which allow patients, clinicians and payers to undertake a realistic estimate on the risk/benefit ratio. This situation creates an urgent demand for research and evaluation in two directions:

First of all, RCT are needed to investigate efficacy of the technologies compared to standard surgical procedures and, if needed also to conservative treatment options.

Second, a monitoring system should be installed to collect information on performance and safety of the technologies under routine care conditions.

4. Economical Evaluation

4.1 Methods

For the systematic review of the economical literature results of the literature searches reported above are screened using specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Transparency and methodological quality of economical studies are assessed and documented using catalogues developed by the GSWG-TAHC. Results are presented, referring to single documents first and afterwards summarised for the different groups of technologies in a qualitative manner. Extraction of cost determinants from recent case series data is also tried in this part. The available data did not permit the calculation of metaanalyses.

4.2 Results

The literature searches yielded two economic analyses and one HTA report including an economic analysis of minimally invasive surgical technologies for lumbar disc herniation. Two economic studies dealing with chemonucleolysis [18], [21] were identified from reference lists - both were due to their early publication date not included in the results of the electronic literature searches. Assessment of transparency and methodological quality of all publications included ranged far below the maximum achievable scores.

APLD

There are two economic analyses [8], [41] comparing the cost-effectiveness of automated percutaneous nucleotomy to that of open diskectomy. The two analyses report contrary results. The paper by Dullerud [8] favours APLD as the clearly more cost-effective procedure while the work of Stevenson et al. [41] concludes that open diskectomy is more cost-effective. The discrepant results are explained by methodological as well as content related issues.

The main difference is caused by the largely differing success rates of APLD that were included in the calculations. Stevenson [41] includes success rates from the only available RCT which includes a study population matching widely accepted in- and exclusion criteria for APLD [33]. Dullerud [8] bases his calculation on more favourable data from two case series with unclear inclusion criteria for the patients treated. Heterogeneity of patient populations probably accounts for the largest part of variability in results. Results furthermore reflect the observation that case series often report more favourable results than controlled trials. More difficulties for the interpretation of results arise from the control procedure selected and from intransparently documented generation of cost data.

Chemonucleolysis

Two economic analyses from the 1990ies compare cost-effectiveness of chemonucleolysis and open diskectomy [18], [21]. Javid [18] based a cost-effectiveness analysis on results of a prospective cohort study. Launois [21] presents a modelling study comparing cost-effectiveness of chemonucleolysis and conventional diskectomy. In spite of methodological differences they arrive at same core conclusion: for carefully selected patients (with sciatic symptoms resistant to conservative care; non-dislocated, non-sequestered lumbar disc herniation) chemonucleolysis seems to be the more cost-effective treatment option.

Endoscopically assisted technologies with posterior access to the disc space

One HTA report from CEDIT (Comité d' Evaluation et de Diffusion des Innovations Technologiques) [26] reports a cost-minimisation analysis concerning this group of procedures based on data from the French hospital association Assistence Publique Hopiteaux de Paris (AP-HP). The authors conclude that the total perioperative costs for the endoscopic procedure in spite of necessary investments for new equipment may be lower than the costs for a standard procedure, due to shorter postoperative stay in hospital. For several reasons these results can hardly be transferred to the German health care context: the procedure assessed (MED®, Sofamor-Danek) is not marketed any more; there are no long- or medium term efficacy data; costs obtained within the French hospital association are not comparable to those arising in the German context.

Our searches retrieved no studies analysing health economic consequences of manual percutaneous nucleotomy, percutaneous laser nucleotomy or endoscopically assisted procedures with posterolateral access to the disc space.

Results from recently published case series indicate a permanently ongoing refining and remodelling of technologies as well as a widening of indication for minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, data from case series are not suitable to describe overall cost determinants.

4.3 Discussion
Amount and quality of health economic data

Evidence to demonstrate efficacy and safety of the six groups of technologies assessed in this volume is very scarce. So it is not surprising that there are only a few studies assessing their economic implications. A comprehensive search strategy detected five economic analyses altogether (two for chemonucleolysis, two for APLD and one for endoscopically assisted surgery with posterior access).

Assessment of methodological quality using checklists developed by the GSWG-TAHC detected profound methodological and content related deficits. In part these deficits result from the scarcity of efficacy data which prohibits the use of sophisticated methods for economic evaluation. The deficits relate to insufficient description of qualitative and quantitative health effects and the lack of precisely defined time frames for analysis. In only one paper modelling of cost-effectiveness over a medium term time period (seven years) is undertaken [21]. Other deficits refer to conception and performance of analyses. The main problems here are non-transparent or superficial assessment of cost determinants and costs. This prohibits transferral of results into other health care systems. Further severe problem are the lack of sensitivity analyses and the only superficial discussion of possible bias in the economic analyses.

Content related problems are elicited by the choice of input data (costs, effectiveness data) and selection of the comparator (open diskectomy or microdiskectomy) for economic analyses.

The relevance of the published economic analyses for decision making in the context of the German health care system is further reduced by the fact that chemonucleolysis and APLD are hardly in use in Germany [40] and the MED® technology on which cost calculations by Maiza et al. [26] are based is not even marketed anymore.

Direct and indirect costs of minimally invasive lumbar disc surgery in the published literature

Information from the published literature concerning costs of minimally invasive surgical procedures is for the reasons named above rather scarce and hardly reliable.

All publications consistently state that direct medical costs of chemonucleolysis and APLD are lower than the costs of standard procedures. In case of endoscopically assisted procedures the same tendency is noted when length of hospital stay after the intervention is taken into consideration (this statement is based on the data from one French cost minimisation analysis.

A differential and quantative interpretation of economical data is hampered by the following problems:

  • In some of the analyses DRG-based flat rates for costs are given without explanation of their quantity structure.
  • In some of the analysis elicitation of costs for surgery is mentioned without documentation of quantity structure or prices.
  • Not given or outdated basic years prohibit conversion and comparison of prices given in different currencies.

Direct non-medical and indirect costs were not analysed in the five economic publications.

For four (manual percutaneous nucleotomy, laser nucleotomy, endoscopically assisted procedures with posterolateral access, Laserforaminoplasty) of the six groups of technologies assessed in this volume no economic analyses were retrieved from the published literature. For these technologies it was attempted to describe a quantity structure of direct costs from data derived from currently published case series.

Analysis of 26 case series published after 1997 demonstrated that the reports included only very few data that could be used to construct a quantity structure for economic analysis. Furthermore, data were extremely variable so that no generalisable information could be extracted.

So it must be concluded that there are no valid cost data for minimally invasive lumbar disc surgery available from the published literature.

Cost effectiveness of minimally invasive lumbar disc surgery

Cost-effectiveness analyses were retrieved from the literature for two of the six groups of procedures assessed: APLD and chemonucleolysis.

- APLD

The two published Analyses yield contrary results. One favours APLD [8] the other one [41] favours microdisectomy as the more cost-effective intervention. The difference is mainly explained by the underlying different estimates of efficacy of APLD (29% vs. 66%). It has to be noted though that the more favourable estimates are derived from case series results, the unfavourable estimates are based on the results of the only published RCT. Cost estimates contribute to the differing results as well. Dullerud [8] and his co-workers use flatrate prices for conventional diskectomy while calculating pure surgical costs for APLD. These two circumstances inevitably produce biased results in favour of APLD. Cost effectiveness calculations by Stevenson et al. [41] are possibly biased in favour on conventional surgery by giving high cost estimates for secondary procedures after failure of APLD.

Although methodological quality of Stevenson's [41] analysis is superior to that of Dullerud [8] its results can still not yield a basis for estimation of cost-effectiveness of APLD within the context of the German health cared system. On the one hand transferability of clinical data is doubtful on the other hand cost calculations are intransparently documented so that they are not comparable to costs arising in the German system.

- Chemonucleolysis

Cost-effectiveness of chemonucleolysis was compared to that of open diskectomy in two analyses from the 1990ies. Despite of conceptual and content related differences both arrive at the core conclusion that chemonucleolysis, including the option of open re-operation after failure of the minimally invasive procedure, is more cost effective than primary open diskectomy. Both analyses are subject to methodological problems that compromise the validity of the core conclusion. Problems include use of open diskectomy as comparison (standard today is microdiskectomy), heterogeneity of patients included as well intransparent documented cost data. The model of Launois et al. [21] does not consider clinical improvement after failure of primary open diskectomy. All problems tend to bias the analyses to favour chemonucleolysis. The papers are not valid as a base for decision making in the context of the German health care system, especially against the background that chymopapain is currently not available in regular pharmaceutical trade.

Costs of minimally invasive surgery for lumbar disc herniation in Germany

This point cannot be clarified by data from the published literature. Economic analyses do not report transparent cost calculations which could be translated for the German context. Case series do not yield data that allow the construction of a quantity structure.

Publications from Germany reporting detailed cost information for lumbar disc surgery were not retrieved by our literature searches.

Research needs

As long as there are no valid data on efficacy, effectiveness and safety of minimally invasive disc surgery it makes little sense to ask for economic evaluations. Only against the background of valid effectiveness data cost-effectiveness can be calculated which could serve as a basis for decision-making. The conclusions of the medical assessment in this volume asked for more RCT and systematic evaluation of performance under conditions of routine care. Both types of evaluations could be accompanied by economical analyses.

5. Conjoint conclusions

Conclusions that can be drawn from the results of the present assessment refer in detail to the specified minimally-invasive procedures of lumbar disc surgery but they may also be considered exemplary for other fields where optimisation of results is attempted by technological development and widening of indications (e.g. total hip replacement [24]).

1.
Compared to standard technologies (open diskectomy, microdiskectomy) and with the exception of chemonucleolysis, the developmental status of all other minimally-invasive procedures assessed must be termed experimental. To date there is no dependable evidence-base to recommend their use in routine clinical practice.
2.
To create such a dependable evidence-base further research in two directions is needed:
a) In order to validly clarify safety and efficacy of minimally invasive procedures compared to standard procedures RCT data are needed. The studies need to include adequate patient populations, use realistic controls (e.g. standard operative procedures or continued conservative care) and use standardised measurements of meaningful outcomes after adequate periods of time. These demands do not only express the view of decisionmakers and payers - they are also devised by the professions themselves [43], [44], [2], [27].
b) Studies that are able to report effectiveness of the procedures under everyday practice conditions and furthermore have the potential to detect rare adverse effects are needed. In Sweden this type of data is yielded by national quality registries. On the one hand their data are used for quality improvement measures and on the other hand they allow comprehensive scientific evaluations.
3.
Since the year of 2000 a continuous rise in utilisation of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery is observed among statutory health insurers. Examples from other areas of innovative surgical technologies (e.g. robot assisted total hip replacement) indicate that the rise will probably continue - especially because there are no legal barriers to hinder introduction of innovative treatments into routine hospital care. Upon request by payers or providers the "Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss" may assess a treatments benefit, its necessity and cost-effectiveness as a prerequisite for coverage by the statutory health insurance. In the case of minimally-invasive disc surgery it would be advisable to examine the legal framework for covering procedures only if they are provided under evaluation conditions. While in Germany coverage under evaluation conditions is established practice in ambulatory health care only ("Modellvorhaben") examples from other European countries (Great Britain, Switzerland) demonstrate that it is also feasible for hospital based interventions. In order to assure protection for patients and providers and at the same time not hinder the further development of new and promising technologies provision under evaluation conditions could also be realised in the private health care market - although in this sector coverage is not by law linked to benefit, necessity and cost-effectiveness of an intervention.

Wissenschaftliche Kurzfassung

1. Einleitung

Rückenschmerzen mit oder ohne ischialgiforme Beschwerden (Beinschmerzen) sind sehr häufig. Die Lebenszeitprävalenz in den westlichen Industrienationen beträgt bis zu 80% [35]. Bei etwa 5% aller Patienten mit akuten Rückenschmerzen werden Bandscheibenvorfälle als Ursache der Symptome angenommen [1]. Als zugrunde liegender Pathomechanismus wird postuliert, dass verlagertes Bandscheibengewebe auf Wurzeln von Spinalnerven drückt, die ihrerseits mit Reizerscheinungen reagieren. Die Folgen sind Schmerzen und neurologische Ausfallserscheinungen. Das Therapiekonzept invasiver Behandlungsverfahren ist kausal konzipiert: Bandscheibengewebe wird entfernt, aufgelöst oder verdampft, um eine Druckentlastung der Nervenwurzeln zu erreichen. Eine klare Indikation zur operativen Behandlung besteht dann, wenn irreversible neurologische Schädigungen zu befürchten sind (Cauda-equina-Syndrom, "drohender Wurzeltod") bzw. schnell fortschreitende Lähmungserscheinungen oder unbeherrschbare Schmerzen auftreten. Diese dramatischen Bilder werden jedoch bei weniger als 5% aller Patienten mit klinisch manifestem Bandscheibenvorfall gesehen. In allen anderen Fällen besteht, wenn überhaupt, nur eine relative Operationsindikation.

Erfolgsaussichten, Notwendigkeit und ökonomische Folgen elektiver bandscheibenchirurgischer Eingriffe werden seit Jahrzehnten kontrovers diskutiert. Anlass hierzu gibt vor allem der hohe Anteil von unbefriedigenden Operationsergebnissen (bis zu 30%) bei einem Krankheitsbild, das unter konservativer Behandlung in den meisten Fällen zwar einen langwierigen und mit hohen indirekten Kosten verbundenen, letztendlich aber benignen Verlauf nimmt.

Wissenschaftlich wird an diesem Problem aus zwei unterschiedlichen Perspektiven gearbeitet. Einerseits soll die Berücksichtigung von patientenabhängigen prognostischen Faktoren, die das Operationsergebnis beeinflussen, künftig eine differenziertere Indikationsstellung ermöglichen. Es können bereits mehrere Merkmale identifiziert werden, die als Risikofaktoren für ein schlechtes Operationsergebnis gelten (Rückenschmerzen als Leitsymptom, psychische Überlagerung der somatischen Symptome, fehlende Kongruenz von klinischen und bildgebenden Befunden, sekundärer Krankheitsgewinn wie Ausgleichszahlungen oder Rentenbegehren usw.). Moderne Leitlinien und Empfehlungen [25] tragen diesen Ergebnissen Rechnung, indem sie eine äußerst zurückhaltende Indikationsstellung zum bandscheibenchirurgischen Eingriff nahe legen.

Andere Forschungsaktivitäten konzentrieren sich auf die Optimierung der Operationsverfahren und hierbei insbesondere auf die weitestgehende Vermeidung von Gewebe- und Knochentraumatisierungen, die als Hauptursache für schlechte Operationsergebnisse gelten. Im Zuge dieser Entwicklung hat sich die mikrochirurgische Bandscheibenoperation (Mikrodiskektomie) gegenüber der offenen Diskektomie als Standardverfahren durchgesetzt.

Gleichzeitig wird eine Vielzahl von Verfahren entwickelt, die sich in der Art des Zugangs zur Bandscheibe, der Weise der Visualisierung des Operationsgebiets und der Form, wie eine Druckentlastung der Nervenwurzeln erreicht werden soll, unterscheiden. Werden nur die Verfahren betrachtet, die bei lumbalem Bandscheibenvorfall und elektiver Operationsindikation als Alternative zum Standardverfahren eingesetzt werden können, lassen sich in zwei Kategorien sechs Verfahrensgruppen mit zahlreichen Einzelvarianten identifizieren:

  • Perkutane Verfahren: Chemonukleolysen, perkutane manuelle Diskusdekompressionen, perkutane automatisierte Diskusdekompressionen, perkutane Laserdiskusdekompressionen oder -diskektomien, Nukleoplastien.
  • Endoskopisch unterstützte minimal-invasive Verfahren mit posterolateralem oder posteriorem Zugang zur Bandscheibe (inkl. endoskopische Laserforaminoplastien (ELF) und perkutane endoskopische Laserdiskusdekompressionen).

Über die Häufigkeit ihres Einsatzes in Deutschland können kaum Aussagen gemacht werden - Daten aus dem Bereich der GKV zufolge machen sie etwa einen Anteil von 5% (2003) an allen Bandscheibenoperationen aus, wobei seit 2000 eine ansteigende Häufigkeit zu beobachten ist. Der wirkliche Anteil ist allerdings höher einzuschätzen, da viele der Verfahren von privaten Leistungsanbietern angeboten und von privaten (Zusatz)versicherungen bzw. von Selbstzahlern finanziert werden.

Bisher ist in Deutschland noch keine umfassende Bewertung der Wirksamkeit, der Sicherheit und der ökonomischen Konsequenzen der minimal-invasiven Bandscheibenoperationsverfahren im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren vorgenommen worden, die als Basis für Kostenübernahmeentscheidungen dienen könnte.

2. Fragestellung

Vor diesem Hintergrund soll der vorliegende Bericht:

  • Anhand der publizierten Literatur eine Bewertung der Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit der einzelnen minimal-invasiven Verfahren im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren vornehmen.
  • Die Identifizierung und Bewertung der Literatur zur Kosteneffektivität der einzelnen minimal-invasiven Verfahren im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren unternehmen.
  • Gegebenenfalls Forschungs- und Evaluationsbedarf sowie Handlungsbedarf im Versorgungssystem aufzeigen.

Da über 95% der Bandscheibenoperationen an der lumbalen Wirbelsäule vorgenommen werden, befasst sich der gegenwärtige Bericht ausschließlich mit dieser Lokalisation. Ausgeschlossen aus der Bewertung werden:

  • Verfahren, die sich eindeutig noch im Experimentalstadium der Entwicklung befinden (z.B. Hydrojetnukleotomie).
  • Verfahren, deren Indikationsstellung von der zum Standardverfahren abweicht (Katheterbehandlungsverfahren, IDET (IDET = Intradiscal Electrothermal Annuloplasty; dt.: Intradiskale Thermotherapie), Bandscheibenprothesen).
  • Verfahren, für die die Literatur zum Zeitpunkt der Berichterstellung nicht zugänglich ist (Nukleoplastie).

3. Medizinische Bewertung

3.1 Methodik

Die Bewertung der Wirksamkeit und der Sicherheit der einzelnen minimal-invasiven Methoden im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren erfolgt in einer systematischen Literaturübersicht. Hierzu wird eine breit angelegte Recherche in 23 elektronischen Literaturdatenbanken vorgenommen. Die Recherchestrategie umfasst Stichworte aus den Themenbereichen "Bandscheibenvorfall", "minimal-invasive Operationsverfahren", "Therapiestudien" und "ökonomische Analysen". Wegen der kontinuierlichen Weiterentwicklung der Operationstechniken wird der Recherchezeitraum auf die letzten fünf Publikationsjahre (Januar 1998 bis Dezember 2003) beschränkt und im Sommer 2004 einmal aktualisiert. Die erste Selektion der Treffer erfolgt nach inhaltlichen sowie nach methodischen Ein- und Ausschlusskriterien anhand der Angaben in Titel und "Abstract". Die zweite Auswahl wird anhand von Volltexten vorgenommen. Die methodische Qualität der verbliebenen Publikationen wird mithilfe der Checklisten der GSWG-HTA überprüft. Die Darstellung der Ergebnisse erfolgt als qualitative Informationssynthese für die einzelnen minimal-invasiven Verfahrensgruppen. Dabei werden auch Ergebnisse aktueller Fallserien vorgestellt und diskutiert. Quantitative Informationssynthesen (Metaanalysen) können auf der Grundlage des vorliegenden Datenmaterials nicht vorgenommen werden.

3.2 Ergebnisse

Das aus insgesamt 1.328 Treffern bestehende Resultat der Literaturrecherche enthält zu den sechs spezifizierten Verfahrensgruppen insgesamt elf aktuelle, den Einschlusskriterien entsprechende Publikationen (vier systematische Literaturübersichten, drei HTA-Berichte und drei RCT, siehe Tabelle 2 [Tab. 2]).

Die methodische Qualität der Übersichtsarbeiten ist sehr heterogen. Die systematischen Übersichtsarbeiten von Gibson et al. [13], Lühmann et al. [25], Boult et al. [4] und des National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) [30], [31] sowie die drei randomisierten kontrollierten Primärstudien entsprechen den meisten Qualitätsanforderungen der GSWG-TAHC. Die Übersicht von Schmid [37] verwendet ein nicht den wissenschaftlichen Standards entsprechendes Verfahren zur quantitativen Informationssynthese, in der Übersicht von Rasmussen et al. fehlt die transparente Darstellung der Recherche und der Studienbewertung. Knight et al. unternehmen Vergleiche von Daten aus sehr heterogenen Quellen. Außer Gibson et al. und Rasmussen et al., deren Arbeiten sich allein auf Ergebnisse von RCT stützen, berücksichtigen alle übrigen Autoren der Übersichtsarbeiten und HTA-Berichte außerdem Daten aus nicht-randomisierten kontrollierten Studien und Fallserien.

Zusätzlich zu diesen, den Einschlusskriterien entsprechenden Publikationen werden aus dem Rechercheergebnis alle zwischen 1998 und 2003 publizierten Fallserien zu den spezifizierten minimal-invasiven Verfahren entnommen sowie gesichtet. Damit stellt sich die Evidenzbasis für die Bewertung der medizinischen Effektivität und Sicherheit der minimal-invasiven Verfahren wie folgt dar:

  • Perkutane manuelle Diskusdekompression: sechs Fallserien (vier nach 1998)
  • Perkutane automatisierte Diskusdekompression: zwei RCT (eine abgebrochen), 12 Fallserien (eine nach 1998)
  • Chemonukleolyse: fünf RCT, fünf kontrollierte Studien, elf Fallserien
  • Perkutane Lasernukleotomie: eine kontrollierte Studie, 13 Fallserien (acht nach 1998)
  • Endoskopische Verfahren: drei RCT, eine kontrollierte Studie, 21 Fallserien (17 nach 1998)

Drei Fallserien zur Nukleoplastie sind im Leihverkehr nicht erhältlich (Zeitschrift erst ab 2004 im Bestand der ZBMed Köln (ZB MED = Deutsche Zentralbibliothek für Medizin)). Aus den vorliegenden Daten ergeben sich die folgenden Bewertungen der medizinischen Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit minimal-invasiver Verfahren.

Perkutane manuelle Nukleotomie

Zu dieser Verfahrensgruppe liegen keine Daten aus kontrollierten Studien vor. Sechs Fallserien mit Nachbeobachtungsdauern von mindestens einem Jahr berichten von sehr unterschiedlichen Ergebnissen. Die anhand von uneinheitlichen Kriterien (modifzierte MacNab-Kriterien, JOA-Score (JOA = Japanese Orthopedic Association, Rückgang von Rücken- bzw. Beinschmerzen) gemessenen Erfolgsraten liegen zwischen 52% und 94%, echte Rezidive treten bei 4,5% bis 19% der operierten Patienten auf. Die Daten der Fallserien deuten an, dass sowohl technische (Menge des entnommenen Diskusmaterials, Visualisierungsmethode) als auch patientenabhängige Faktoren (Art des Bandscheibenvorfalls) die Erfolgsraten beeinflussen. Die überwiegende Zahl der Fallserien setzt die Methode bei kleinen, das Längsband nicht durchbrechenden Hernien und Protrusionen ein.

Die zur Verfügung stehenden Daten erlauben keine generalisierbare Beurteilung der Wirksamkeit des Verfahrens, vor allem nicht im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff.

Automatisierte perkutane lumbale Nukleotomie (APLD)

Die Wirksamkeit der APLD im Vergleich zur Wirksamkeit zur Mikrodiskektomie bzw. zur konventionellen Diskektomie wird bisher in zwei methodisch validen RCT untersucht. Eingeschlossen sind Patienten mit kleinen Diskushernien oder -protrusionen, bei denen eine therapieresistente ischialgiforme Symptomatik das Beschwerdebild prägt. Beide Studien müssen vorzeitig abgebrochen werden. Die RCT von Chatterjee et al. [5] wird nach Rekrutierung von 71 Patienten (von angestrebten 160) abgebrochen, als eine Zwischenauswertung der Ergebnisse nach sechs Monaten ergibt, dass die mit APLD operierten Patienten im Vergleich zu den mikroskopisch operierten Patienten signifikant schlechtere Resultate aufweisen (MacNab: 33% Erfolge vs. 82% Erfolge, p<0,001). Die zweite RCT von Haines et al. [14], die einen Vergleich der Effektivität der automatischen (APD) und der endoskopischen perkutanen Diskektomie (EPD) mit der Effektivität der konventionellen Diskektomie vornehmen soll, wird aufgrund von Rekrutierungsschwierigkeiten vorzeitig abgebrochen. Statt 330 können nur 34 Patienten eingeschlossen werden. Die Erfolgsraten (MacNab) weisen keine statistisch signifikanten Unterschiede auf, sie liegen bei allen Gruppen nach sechs Monaten um 40%. Hauptgrund für das Rekrutierungsproblem ist in dieser Studie, dass nur ein sehr geringer Anteil von Patienten die (auch von internationalen Leitlinien und der Food and Drug Administration (FDA) bestätigten) Indikationskriterien für eine APLD erfüllen.

Im Gegensatz dazu zeigen zwölf Fallserien mit ähnlicher Patientenklientel Erfolgsraten zwischen 56% und 92%.

Zusammenfassend lässt sich feststellen, dass die Wirksamkeit der APLD der der Mikrodiskektomie vermutlich unterlegen ist. Weiterhin zeigen die Studienergebnisse, dass aus Fallseriendaten keine verwertbaren Informationen für einen validen Wirksamkeitsvergleich entnommen werden können.

Perkutane Lasernukleotomie/Laserdiskusdekompression

Zu dieser Verfahrensgruppe berichtet eine kontrollierte Studie [3] an Patienten mit monosegmentalen ischialgiformen Beschwerden, bei denen am vermuteten Level ein nicht extrudierter und nicht-sequestrierter Bandscheibenvorfall in der Kernspinresonanz (NMR = Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) nachweisbar ist, von einer im Vergleich zu historischen Kontrollen schlechteren Wirksamkeit der Lasermethode (65% exzellente und gute Ergebnisse) gegenüber der Standarddiskektomie (85% exzellente und gute Ergebnisse).

Insgesamt 13 Fallserien geben Erfolgsraten zwischen 56,5% und 91,5% an. Dabei weisen die Studien eine erhebliche Heterogenität in den verwendeten Technologien, den Nachbeobachtungszeiten und der Art der erfassten Outcome auf. Bei den eingeschlossenen Patienten handelt es sich in erster Linie um Betroffene mit Protrusionen oder gedeckten Bandscheibenvorfällen, radikulären Symptomen und Bestätigung des klinischen Befunds durch die Bildgebung. In den meisten Fällen ist eine erfolglose konservative Behandlung ein Einschlusskriterium.

Belastbare Daten zur Beurteilung der Wirksamkeit der Lasernukleotomie im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren sind damit nicht verfügbar. Aus den Ergebnissen der Fallserien lassen sich keine allgemein gültigen Kenngrößen für die Wirksamkeit des Verfahrens ableiten.

Das britische NICE lässt die Methode zur Anwendung innerhalb des National Health System (NHS) unter Studien- bzw. Auditbedingungen zu und schreibt eine Patientenaufklärung über die nicht gesicherte Wirksamkeit des Verfahrens vor.

Chemonukleolyse

Die Bewertung der medizinischen Wirksamkeit der Chemonukleolyse im Vergleich zur Standarddiskektomie ist die einzige, die sich auf Daten aus RCT stützen kann. Insgesamt werden fünf RCT zum Thema publiziert [6], [9], [22], [29], [42]. Alle Studien schliessen Patienten mit Nervenwurzelkompressionssymptomatik, durch Bildgebung bestätigten Bandscheibenvorfall und ergebnislosen konservativen Behandlungsversuchen ein. Die Nachbeobachtungsdauer beträgt ein bis zwei Jahre, Zielgrößen sind die Notwendigkeit eines Zweiteingriffs und die Bewertung des Eingriffs als Erfolg durch den Operateur, den Patienten bzw. einen unabhängigen Untersucher. Die im Cochrane Review durchgeführte metaanalytische Zusammenfassung der Studienergebnisse zeigt im Vergleich zur Mikrodiskektomie bzw. Standarddiskektomie unterlegene Resultate (höhere Misserfolgsrate nach 12 Monaten; höhere Wahrscheinlichkeit für eine Reoperation nach sechs bis 24 Monaten) für die Chemonukleolyse.

Im gleichen Cochrane Review werden außerdem Studien analysiert, die die Wirksamkeit der Chemonukleolyse gegen Plazebobehandlung (+ fortgeführte konservative Therapie) untersuchen [7], [10], [11], [17], [39]. Diese, als methodisch hochwertig befundenen Arbeiten können in der Zusammenfassung für den Gesamterfolg (bewertet durch Patienten, Operateur oder unabhängigen Untersucher) durchweg überlegene Ergebnisse für die Chemonukleolyse feststellen. Gibson et al. [12] kommen somit zu der Schlussfolgerung, dass die Chemonukleolyse am ehesten als intermediäre Therapieoption zwischen konservativem und operativem Vorgehen einzuordnen ist. Dies wird vor allem auch durch die Ergebnisse der Studie von Van Alphen et al. [42] gestützt, die keine Unterschiede zwischen den Untersuchungsgruppen in der Auswertung von Chemonukleolyse plus optionaler Diskektomie vs. Diskektomie allein (Erfolg, Patienteneinschätzung) finden können.

Das Chympopapainpräparat für die Chemonukleolyse ist in Deutschland derzeit im Handel nicht mehr erhältlich.

Endoskopisch unterstützte minimal invasive Bandscheibenchirurgie

Die Wirksamkeit endoskopischer Verfahren im Vergleich zur Mikrodiskektomie wird bisher in drei RCT untersucht, darunter die abgebrochene Studie von Haines et al. deren Ergebnisse nicht verwertbar sind. In einer weiteren RCT [28] werden 40 Patienten mit gedeckten bzw. sehr kleinen subligamentären Hernien eingeschlossen, die therapieresistente ischialgiforme Beschwerden und leichte neurologische Symptome sowie einen kongruenten radiologischen Befund (gedeckte oder subligamentäre Hernie) aufweisen. Aufgrund der kleinen Patientenzahlen können keine statistisch signifikanten Erfolgsunterschiede zwischen den Behandlungsgruppen nachgewiesen werden. Tendenziell scheint die postoperative Befundbesserung in der Endoskopiegruppe jedoch günstiger. Die deutlichsten Unterschiede zeigen sich bei der postoperativen Beeinträchtigungsdauer und bei der Wiederaufnahme der Berufstätigkeit. Hier ist die Endoskopiegruppe eindeutig im Vorteil. Allerdings müssen sich hier drei von 20 Personen einem Zweiteingriff unterziehen, in der Mikrodiskektomiegruppe ist dies bei einem von 20 Teilnehmern der Fall.

Die dritte RCT [15] schliesst insgesamt 60 Patienten (30 je Studienarm) mit radikulärer Symptomatik und nachgewiesenem lumbalen intrakanalikulären Bandscheibenvorfall ein. Auch diese Studie kann, bei vergleichbaren klinischen Ergebnissen (Erfolgsrate; Zufriedenheit mit dem Operationsergebnis), Vorteile für die endoskopisch operierten Patienten in der postoperativen Befundbesserung erkennen. In beiden Studien wird ein endoskopisches Verfahren mit posterolateralem, transforaminalem Zugang zur Bandscheibe gewählt.

In der Literaturübersicht von Schmid [37] werden zur Beschreibung der Effektivität endoskopisch unterstützter Diskektomien die Ergebnisse von zwei Fallserien sowie einer nicht-randomisierten Vergleichsstudie zusammengefasst [19], [23], [38]. Die Rate zufrieden stellender Resultate variiert zwischen 72% und 91%. Hierbei ist allerdings zu beachten, dass die Zusammenfassung keine technischen Unterschiede der Methoden berücksichtigt.

Zwischen 1998 und 2004 werden 14 weitere Fallserien publiziert, die vor allem die permanente Weiterentwicklung der Operationstechniken und die Aufweitung der Indikationsstellung reflektieren. Daraus ergibt sich das Problem, dass ihre Ergebnisse kaum direkt miteinander vergleichbar sind. Für die endoskopischen Verfahren mit posterolateralem transforaminalem Zugang zur Bandscheibe variieren die in neun Fallserien berichteten Erfolgsraten zwischen 69% und 90%. Fünf Fallserien, in denen der Zugang zur Bandscheibe über einen posterioren Zugang erreicht wird, informieren über Erfolgsraten zwischen 90% und 94%. In die meisten Fallserien sind Patienten mit allen Arten von Bandscheibenvorfällen eingeschlossen.

Unter den endoskopischen Verfahren nimmt die perkutane endoskopische Laserdiskektomie (PELD) mit ihrer Kombination aus endoskopischer und Lasertechnologie eine Sonderstellung ein. Auch ihre Wirksamkeit ist bisher nicht in kontrollierten Studien belegt. Vier Fallserien und Zeitvergleiche berichten von Erfolgsraten zwischen 60% und 87%.

Eine weitere Sonderstellung wird von der ursprünglich zur Behandlung von Rezessusstenosen eingesetzten ELF eingenommen. Auch für dieses Verfahren liegen keine Wirksamkeitsnachweise aus kontrollierten Studien vor. Alle bisher publizierten Fallserien stammen aus einem einzigen operativen Zentrum und nennen Erfolgsraten um 70%.

Zusammenfassend lässt sich feststellen, dass die endoskopisch unterstützten minimal-invasiven Verfahren zu der Gruppe gehören, in der zurzeit am meisten Entwicklungsarbeit zu beobachten ist. Zu den Verfahren liegen Daten aus zwei RCT vor. Beide finden keine signifikanten Unterschiede in der Wirksamkeit (als Erfolgsrate) im Vergleich zur Standardtherapie, aber Hinweise auf eine schnellere postoperative Genesung. Diese Ergebnisse beziehen sich auf Patienten mit kleinen bzw. subligamentären Bandscheibenvorfällen. Die Resultate der Fallserien zu Patienten mit nicht-gedeckten, dislozierten und/oder sequestierten Vorfällen lassen auch unter dieser Indikationsstellung eine gute Wirksamkeit vermuten - der Studientyp Fallserie erlaubt allerdings keine vergleichenden oder verallgemeinerbaren Aussagen.

Zur Wirksamkeit der ELF und der PELD im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff lassen sich auf der Grundlage der verfügbaren Daten keine Aussagen machen.

Sicherheit der Verfahren

Die Ergebnisse zur Sicherheit der minimal-invasiven Verfahren im Vergleich zur Standardmethode lassen sich noch schlechter zusammenfassen als die Wirksamkeitsergebnisse. Die Erfassung von Komplikationen erfolgt noch weniger standardisiert als die von Operationserfolgen - zumeist handelt es sich um anekdotische Beschreibungen von Einzelereignissen. Wegen der Seltenheit der Ereignisse sind darüber hinaus Studien mit relativ niedrigen Teilnehmerzahlen nicht geeignet, Komplikationsraten mit statistisch akzeptabler Sicherheit zu berichten. Die vorsichtige Interpretation der Fallseriendaten deutet jedoch an, dass die Raten ernsthafter Komplikationen aller minimal-invasiven Verfahren keinesfalls über denen der Standardeingriffe liegen.

3.3 Diskussion
Menge und Qualität der verfügbaren Evidenz, Übertragbarkeit der Ergebnisse

Es besteht weitgehender Konsens von wissenschaftlicher Seite aber auch unter Entscheidungsträgern, dass die Bewertung der Wirksamkeit von Behandlungsverfahren anhand von qualitativ hochwertigen kontrollierten Studien, am besten RCT, erfolgen sollte. Die Feststellung der Wirksamkeit ist eine notwendige Voraussetzung für die Bewertung des Nutzens, die weitere Qualitäten (Sicherheit, Zugänglichkeit) und unterschiedliche Perspektiven (Patienten, Kliniker, Sozialversicherer, Gesamtgesellschaft) berücksichtigen muss. Für die sechs im Rahmen dieser Bewertung betrachteten Verfahrensgruppen liegen zur Bewertung der medizinischen Wirksamkeit insgesamt nur neun Studien dieses Typs vor, die darüber hinaus teilweise erhebliche methodische Mängel aufweisen. Problembereiche sind sehr kleine Patientenzahlen, unzureichend beschriebene Randomisierungstechniken, die Verwendung von schlecht standardisierten und unverblindeten Ergebnismessungen sowie kurze Nachbeobachtungsdauern. Fünf RCT bewerten die Wirksamkeit der Chemonukleolyse, ein Verfahren, das in Deutschland zurzeit nur unter erschwerten Bedingungen einsetzbar ist. Drei RCT untersuchen die Wirksamkeit von endoskopischen Verfahren im Vergleich zu offenen Eingriffen. Eine der Arbeiten berichtet über keine klinischen Outcomes (Schick et al. [36]). Die Ergebnisse der beiden verbliebenen RCT sind nicht direkt vergleichbar wegen technischer Unterschiede bei den verwendeten Operationstechniken (Interventions- und Vergleichstechnologie), der Art der erfassten Outcomes und der Nachbeobachtungsdauern. Zur automatisierten perkutanen lumbalen Diskotomie (APLD) liegen die Ergebnisse einer RCT (Chatterjee [5]) vor, die wegen hochüberlegener Ergebnisse der Vergleichstechnologie (Mikrodiskektomie) vorzeitig abgebrochen wird. Eine zweite RCT (Haines et al. [14]) zur APLD wird wegen Rekrutierungsschwierigkeiten abgebrochen. Zur manuellen perkutanen Nukleotomie, zur Laserdiskektomie und zur Nukleoplastie liegen keine RCT vor.

Alle weiteren Daten zur Wirksamkeit der minimal-invasiven Eingriffe stammen aus Fallserien. Auch innerhalb der einzelnen Verfahrensgruppen sind die Fallserien von großer Heterogenität gekennzeichnet. Unterschiede finden sich in den eingeschlossenen Patientengruppen, den technischen Spezifika der Operationsverfahren, dem Setting, den betrachteten Zielgrößen, den Beobachtungszeiträumen und der Vollständigkeit der Beobachtungen. Unter günstigsten Bedingungen (ausreichend spezifiziertes Verfahren, adäquate Indikationsstellung, dokumentierte Begleitbehandlungen, standardisierte objektive Erfassung von Zielgrößen, nahezu vollständige Nachverfolgung) kann anhand von Fallseriendaten eine Aussage über die Wirksamkeit und/oder Sicherheit des jeweiligen Verfahrens in der hochspezifischen Situation für das jeweilige behandelnde Zentrum gemacht werden. Aussagen für die ganze Verfahrensgruppe bzw. Aussagen zur vergleichenden Wirksamkeit/Sicherheit mit einem Standardverfahren können aus den Ergebnissen der Fallserien nicht abgeleitet werden.

Bei der Frage nach der Übertragbarkeit der internationalen Studienergebnisse auf den bundesdeutschen Entscheidungskontext treten nationale systembedingte Besonderheiten nach drei inhaltlichen Hauptproblemen, die den Vergleich von Studienergebnissen und ihre Interpretation erschweren, in den Hintergrund.

1.
Die ständige Weiterentwicklung der Technologien führt zu der bereits angesprochenen Methodenvielfalt, die übergreifende Aussagen für eine Verfahrensgruppe verhindert. Dabei betrifft die Vielfalt nicht nur die minimal-invasiven Verfahren sondern auch die Standardtechnologie, gegen deren Ergebnisse der Wirksamkeitsvergleich stattfinden soll.
2.
Das zweite Problem betrifft die Heterogenität der Patientenklientel in den einzelnen Studien. Durchgängiges Einschlusskriterium für alle Arbeiten ist das Persistieren von ischialgieformen Beschwerden mit oder ohne neurologische Ausfallserscheinungen nach einer unterschiedlich langen Phase ergebnisloser konservativer Behandlung. Unterschiede werden bei der Befundbewertung durch bildgebende Verfahren deutlich. Innerhalb jeder Verfahrensgruppe werden anhand der bildgebenden Befunde unterschiedliche Ein- und Ausschlusskriterien formuliert, die sich vor allem hinsichtlich des Dislokationsgrads des Bandscheibenvorfalls und des Vorhandenseins von Sequestern unterscheiden.
3.
Der dritte Aspekt betrifft die wenig standardisierte Erhebung der Outcomes in den einzelnen Studien, die auch noch in variablen Abständen zum Eingriff stattfindet. Die in den Studien zu minimal-invasiven Eingriffen häufig verwendete dichotome Beurteilung Erfolg vs. Misserfolg beruht ihrerseits auf einer Vielzahl von unterschiedlichen Erfassungsinstrumenten und Prozeduren, von denen viele (Kriterien nach MacNab und ihre Modifikationen) auf der subjektiven Einschätzung des Operationsergebnisses durch den Patienten oder durch den Operateur beruhen. Zur Übertrag- und Vergleichbarkeit dieser Bewertungen, vor allem wenn sie in verschiedenen kulturellen Kontexten erhoben werden, gibt es unseres Wissens keine systematische Diskussion.

Bereits 1999 weisen Gibson et al. [13] in den Schlussfolgerungen des Cochrane Review auf die dringende Notwendigkeit hin, methodisch adäquate RCT durchzuführen, um die Frage nach der Wirksamkeit der minimal-invasiven Methoden im Vergleich zu den Standardverfahren adäquat beantworten zu können - diese Schlussfolgerung wird von allen Autoren der im Zuge dieser Bewertung gesichteten Literaturübersichten [4], [25], [30], [31], [34] geteilt.

Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit unter Studienbedingungen

Die Einschätzung der Wirksamkeit verschiedener minimal-invasiver Methoden im Vergleich zu der des Standardverfahrens (Mikrodiskektomie, offene Diskektomie) ist die zentrale Fragestellung dieses Berichts. Ihre Beantwortung ist aus den oben geschilderten methodischen und inhaltlichen Gründen kaum zu leisten.

Die aus methodischer Sicht qualitativ hochwertigsten Informationen beschreiben die Wirksamkeit der Chemonukleolyse im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff. Die Ergebnisse von RCT legen den Einsatz des Verfahrens als intermediäre Therapieoption zwischen konservativer und operativer Behandlung nahe. Die Chemonukleolyse wird in Deutschland (auch in den USA) nur noch selten eingesetzt. Als Grund hierfür wird zumeist die Gefahr allergischer bzw. schwerer neurologischer Komplikationen (z.B. transverse Myelititis) angeführt [37], [40]. Anhand publizierter Zahlen ist dieses Argument schwer nachvollziehbar. Die Reanalyse aller Chemonukleolysestudienarme vom Cochrane Review [20] und von zwei Postmarketing-Studien (USA 1984: 29.057 Behandlungsfälle; Europa 1987: 18.925 Behandlungsfälle) berichten von Komplikationsraten. Danach beträgt die Rate an systemischen Komplikationen, die auf allergische Reaktionen zurückzuführen sind, weniger als 2%, darunter weniger als 1% Anaphylaxien mit Kreislaufreaktionen. Anaphylaxien mit Todesfolge werden in der amerikanischen Datenbank in 0,07% der Fälle, in Europa gar nicht beobachtet.

Die zweite Verfahrensgruppe, zu der eine Aussage zur Wirksamkeit im Vergleich zu der des Standardverfahrens gemacht werden kann, sind die endoskopisch unterstützten Eingriffe. Hier ist jedoch zu beachten, dass es sich um eine ausgesprochen heterogene Gruppe von Operationstechnologien handelt. Die Ergebnisse von zwei RCT [28], [15] zeigen keinen Unterschied zwischen den klinischen Erfolgsraten beim Vergleich zum Standardverfahren. Eine konsistente Beobachtung in beiden Studien ist jedoch, dass die durchschnittlichen Zeiten bis zur Wiederaufnahme der Alltags- bzw. Berufstätigkeit in den endoskopisch operierten Gruppen deutlich kürzer sind. Die Resultate weisen darauf hin, dass die endoskopischen Technologien möglicherweise Vorteile hinsichtlich sozialmedizinischer Outcome bieten. Diese Aussage bezieht sich auf Techniken mit posterolateralem Zugang bei Patienten mit kleinen nicht-sequestrierten Bandscheibenvorfällen. Bei der Interpretation der Ergebnisse ist weiterhin zu prüfen, ob die 1993 bzw. 1999 eingesetzten Technologien noch dem heutigen Vorgehen entsprechen.

Alle weiteren Informationen zu klinischer Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit der endoskopisch unterstützten Eingriffe stammen aus Fallserien. Hier verhindert die Vielfalt der eingesetzten endoskopischen Operationsverfahren und die Heterogenität der eingeschlossenen Patienten eine Aussage zu den Erfolgserwartungen für die gesamte Verfahrensgruppe. Es wird dabei ein gewisser zeitlicher Trend erkennbar: Während ältere Fallserien (vor 2000 publiziert) den minimal-invasiven Eingriff vorwiegend bei Patienten mit kleinen bzw. gedeckten Vorfällen einsetzen, schließen neuere Studien auch Patienten mit größeren, dislozierten oder sequestrierten Vorfällen ein. Die genannten (mit variablem Messinstrumentarium und nach variablen Beobachtungszeiträumen gemessenen) Erfolgsraten liegen für die endoskopischen Verfahren in der gleichen Größenordnung wie die für die konventionellen Verfahren genannten Raten. Die einzige Aussage, die sich auf der Grundlage dieser Daten treffen lässt, ist, dass sich die Erfolgsraten der Verfahren nicht deutlich unterscheiden.

Die Interpretation der Daten zur Sicherheit der Verfahren gestaltet sich noch schwieriger. Während für die Zielgröße für die Messung von Erfolg eine Operationalisierung im Sinne einer Kriterienbildung nach MacNab oder ähnlichen Schemata zumindest versucht wird, erfolgt dies für die unerwünschten Wirkungen in der Regel nicht. Über sie wird meist unsystematisch und kasuistisch berichtet. Häufig fehlt eine Differenzierung nach Schweregraden und nach Spezifität für den durchgeführten Eingriff. Die in den Fallserien beschriebenen Häufigkeiten schwerwiegender Komplikationen (Diszitiden, Duraverletzungen/-fisteln, Nervenwurzelschädigung zusammen) liegen für die endoskopischen Verfahren deutlich unter 5% und damit in der gleichen Größenordnung wie die für Standard- und Mikrodiskektomie berichteten Raten [16].

Die Bewertung der Wirksamkeit der APLD im Vergleich zur Mikrodiskektomie kann sich auf die Daten einer RCT [5] stützen. Diese zeigt deutlich schlechtere Ergebnisse für die APLD im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren. Die primäre Erfolgsrate der APLD beträgt 29%, die der Mikrodiskektomie 80%. Diese Resultate kontrastieren stark zu denen aus den Fallserien. Hier wird über Erfolgsraten zwischen 56% und 9% berichtet. Als Gründe für die Unterschiede werden insbesondere Charakteristika des zu behandelnden Bandscheibenvorfalls (Alter und Dehydrationszustand des Vorfalls, Form: breit- vs. schmalbasige Diskushernie, Vorbehandlungen) diskutiert, ohne jedoch zur Klärung zu kommen. Vor diesem Hintergrund scheinen zwei Schlussfolgerungen gerechtfertigt:

1.
Die APLD scheint keine geeignete alternative Behandlungsform zur Mikrodiskektomie bei Patienten mit kleinen gedeckten Bandscheibenvorfällen zu sein.
2.
Die Ergebnisse von Fallserien erlauben keine verallgemeinerbaren Aussagen zur Wirksamkeit von Behandlungsverfahren, vor allem nicht zur Wirksamkeit von zwei (oder mehreren) Verfahren im Vergleich.

Zur Abschätzung der Wirksamkeit der perkutanen manuellen Diskektomie im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren stehen keine Daten aus kontrollierten Studien zur Verfügung. Die sechs verfügbaren Fallserien, darunter drei nach 1998 publiziert, berichten von sehr variablen Erfolgraten zwischen 52% und 94%. Aus den Daten ergeben sich Hinweise auf eine Abhängigkeit der Ergebnisse vom anatomischen Befund des Bandscheibenvorfalls (Prolaps vs. Protrusion) und technisch-methodischen Unterschieden im Operationsverfahren (Menge des entnommenen Diskusmaterials). Allerdings sind dies nur Einzelbeobachtungen, die keinesfalls eine Basis für eine abschließende Beurteilung des Verfahrens bilden. Zu Komplikationsraten liegen kaum Angaben vor, so dass keine allgemeine Aussage gemacht werden kann.

Zur klinischen Wirksamkeit der perkutanen Lasernukleotomieverfahren stehen ebenfalls nur Daten aus Fallserien zur Verfügung, die keine Aussage über den Stellenwert der Verfahren(sgruppe) im Vergleich zu den Standardeingriffen erlauben. Wie auch bei den endoskopischen Verfahren handelt es sich bei den Lasertechnologien um eine technisch heterogene Gruppe. Es kommen verschiedene Laser in unterschiedlicher Dosierung, mit verschiedenen Applikationsinstrumenten, unter Zuhilfenahme diverser Visualisierungstechniken und in unterschiedlichen Settings (radiologische Abteilung vs. Neurochirurgie oder Orthopädie, ambulante vs. stationäre Eingriffe) zur Anwendung. Aussagen zu Komplikationen werden überhaupt nur in drei der Fallserien gemacht, hier liegen die Raten für schwere Komplikationen extrem niedrig (<1% für Diszitiden).

Wirksamkeit der Technologien unter Alltagsbedingungen

Aussagen zur Wirksamkeit von Technologien unter Alltagsbedingungen können in erster Linie fünf Arten von Datenquellen entnommen werden: so genannten "pragmatischen" kontrollierten Studien, Nachbeobachtungsstudien mit Bevölkerungs- oder Regionalbezug, Anwendungsbeobachtungen, Surveillancedaten und Registerstudien.

Für die minimal-invasiven bandscheibenchirurgischen Eingriffe stehen derartige Daten (zurzeit noch) nicht zur Verfügung. Nur für die Chemonukleolyse geben ältere Surveillancedaten (Nordby et al. [32]) Auskunft über Art und Häufigkeit von Komplikationen, nicht aber über die Wirksamkeit unter Alltagsbedingungen.

Ein nationales Register für bandscheibenchirurgische Eingriffe existiert in Schweden. Hier werden etwa 85% aller in diesem skandinavischen Land durchgeführten Wirbelsäuleneingriffe erfasst. Ziele der Registrierung sind, die Effektivität, die Wirtschaftlichkeit und die Qualität der Patientenversorgung zu verbessern. Hierzu werden individuelle Patientendaten zu Diagnosen, Behandlungen sowie Outcomes (ein und zwei Jahre postoperativ) erfasst, zentral ausgewertet und an die operierenden Abteilungen zurückgemeldet. Für die vorliegende Bewertung wird der Jahresbericht 2003 (basierend auf Daten von 2002) des schwedischen Registers auf Anfrage zur Verfügung gestellt. Differenzierte Auswertungen zu minimal-invasiven Eingriffen sind aufgrund geringer Fallzahlen bisher noch nicht vorgenommen worden, werden aber Gegenstand künftiger Publikationen sein (Strömqvist, persönliche Kommunikation).

Zusammenfassend lässt sich feststellen, dass zum derzeitigen Zeitpunkt die Frage nach der Wirksamkeit und der Sicherheit minimal-invasiver Behandlungsverfahren des lumbalen Bandscheibenvorfalls unter Alltagsbedingungen auf der Grundlage der publizierten Literatur nicht beantwortet werden kann.

Forschungsbedarf

Die Anwendungspraxis der alternativ zur Mikrodiskektomie einsetzbaren minimal-invasiven Behandlungsverfahren ist durch die paradoxe Situation gekennzeichnet, dass eine unüberschaubare Vielfalt an Verfahren angeboten, intensiv beworben und vermarktet wird sowie gleichzeitig keine belastbaren Informationen für Patienten, Kostenträger oder interessierte potentielle Anwender zur Verfügung stehen, die eine realistische Nutzen-Risikoabwägung ermöglichen.

Dadurch entsteht dringender Bedarf an Forschung und Evaluation in zwei Richtungen: Einerseits werden RCT gebraucht, die die Wirksamkeit der Methoden im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren, gegebenenfalls auch im Vergleich zu konservativen Therapieoptionen abschätzen lassen und andererseits Evaluationssysteme, die ein Monitoring von Erfolgen/Misserfolgen des Technologieeinsatzes unter Routinebedingungen erlauben.

4. Ökonomische Bewertung

4.1 Methodik

Für die systematische Übersicht über gesundheitsökonomische Bewertungen minimal-invasiver bandscheibenchirurgischer Eingriffe wird das Ergebnis der oben im Kapitel "Methodik" dargestellten Literaturrecherche nach spezifischen Ein- und Ausschlusskriterien gesichtet. Transparenz und methodische Qualität der aufgefundenen gesundheitsökonomischen Studien werden mithilfe der entsprechenden Kataloge der GSWG-TAHC vorgenommen. Die Resultate werden zunächst dokumentenbezogen dargestellt, gefolgt von einer qualitativen gesundheitsökonomischen Informationssynthese für die einzelnen minimal-invasiven Verfahrensgruppen. In diesem Teil wird auch eine Extraktion von Kostendeterminanten aus aktuellen Fallserien versucht und diskutiert. Quantitative Informationssynthesen (Metaanalysen, Modellierungen) können auf der Grundlage des vorliegenden Datenmaterials nicht vorgenommen werden.

4.2 Ergebnisse

Nach Durchsicht der aufgefundenen Literatur sowie der Selektion der Artikel nach Titel und Zusammenfassung, gefolgt von der Auswahl aufgrund der Volltexte können ein HTA-Bericht und zwei gesundheitsökonomische Analysen identifiziert werden, in denen eine Bewertung eines minimal-invasiven Verfahrens im Vergleich zum Standardverfahren durchgeführt wird. Für die Chemonukleolyse werden Hinweise auf zwei gesundheitsökonomische Analysen [18], [21] aus Referenzlisten entnommen - beide sind wegen ihres frühen Publikationsdatums nicht im elektronischen Rechercheergebnis enthalten.

Die Bewertung von Transparenz und methodischer/inhaltlicher Qualität liegt weit unter den erreichbaren Werten für qualitativ hochwertige gesundheitsökonomische Evaluationen.

Perkutane automatisierte lumbale Nukleotomie

Zum Vergleich der Kosteneffektivität der perkutanen automatisierten Nukleotomie mit dem offenen operativen Eingriff liegen zwei gesundheitsökonomische Analysen vor [8], [41]. Sie kommen zu grundsätzlich konträren Ergebnissen: Die Arbeit von Dullerud et al. [8] favorisiert die APLD als die eindeutig kosteneffektivere Methode, die Arbeit von Stevenson [41] kommt zu dem Schluss, das Standardverfahren sei die eindeutig kosteneffektivere Methode. Gründe für diese gegenläufigen Resultate sind sowohl im Studiendesign als auch auf inhaltlicher Seite zu suchen.

Die Hauptursache für die gegensätzlichen Aussagen ist in den stark unterschiedlichen Erfolgsraten nach APLD zu sehen. Die klinischen Daten von Stevenson et al. [41] werden aus einer RCT gewonnen, deren Ein- und Ausschlusskriterien den gängigen Empfehlungen [33] für die Indikationsstellung zur APLD entsprechen. Die Daten von Dullerud et al. [8] stammen aus zwei Fallserien, wobei die Einschlusskriterien auch in den Quellpublikationen nur unscharf beschrieben sind. Es ist zu vermuten, dass die Unterschiede in den Studienpopulationen den größten Teil der Variabilität der Ergebnisse erklären. Die Resultate reflektieren außerdem die Beobachtung, dass sich die Erfolgsraten der APLD in Fallserien wesentlich günstiger darstellen als in kontrollierten Studien.

Weitere Interpretationsprobleme ergeben sich aus der Wahl des Vergleichsverfahrens und aus der intransparent dokumentierten Generierung der Kostendaten.

Chemonukleolyse

Zum Vergleich der Kosteneffektivität der Chemonukleolyse mit dem offenen operativen Eingriff liegen zwei gesundheitsökonomische Analysen aus den 90er Jahren vor [18], [21]. Bei der Arbeit von Javid [18] handelt es sich um eine prospektive Kohortenstudie mit Kostenanalysen, die Untersuchung von Launois [21] stellt eine gesundheitsökonomische Modellierung der Kosteneffektivität von Chemonukleolyse und konventioneller Diskektomie vor. Im Wesentlichen kommen sie, trotz methodischer Unterschiede und Schwächen, zu der gleichen Kernaussage: Für ausgewählte Patienten (nicht-dislozierte, nicht-sequestrierte Bandscheibenvorfälle bei ausgeprägter, therapieresistenter ischialgiformer Symptomatik) stellt die Chemonukleolyse im Vergleich zur offenen Diskektomie die kostengünstigere Therapieoption dar.

Endoskopisch unterstützte Verfahren mit posteriorem Zugang zur Bandscheibe

Zu dieser Verfahrensgruppe liegt eine aus dem französischen Krankenhausverbund Assistence Publique Hopiteaux de Paris (AP-HP) stammende Kostenminimierungsstudie vor, die im Kontext eines HTA-Berichts durch das französische Institut CEDIT (Comité d' Evaluation et de Diffusion des Innovations Technologiques) [26] unternommen wird. Die Autoren kommen zu der Einschätzung, dass die perioperativen Gesamtkosten für den endoskopischen Eingriff trotz erfordelicher Investitionen in zusätzliche Geräte unter denen des Standardeingriffs liegen können, wenn die verkürzte Krankenhausaufenthaltsdauer berücksichtigt wird.

Für die Verwendung im bundesdeutschen Entscheidungskontext haben diese Ergebnisse aus mehreren Gründen allenfalls hinweisenden Charakter: Das bewertete Verfahren (MED® der Firma Sofamor-Danek) ist in dieser Form nicht mehr auf dem Markt, der Nachweis einer vergleichbaren Wirksamkeit, auch über die unmittelbar perioperative Phase hinaus, steht aus und schließlich ist die Übertragbarkeit der im französischen Krankenhausverbund ermittelten Kosten nicht gegeben.

Zu den gesundheitsökonomischen Implikationen der Methoden perkutane manuelle Nukleotomie, perkutane Lasernukleotomie und endoskopisch unterstützten Verfahren mit posterolateralem Zugang zur Bandscheibe liegen bisher keine gesundheitsökonomischen Studien oder Analysen vor. Die Durchsicht von neueren Fallserien weist sowohl auf die weiter laufende technische Entwicklung der Prozeduren hin wie auch auf eine Ausweitung der Indikationsstellung. Damit sind die Fallseriendaten nicht für eine übergreifende Beschreibung von Kostendeterminanten geeignet.

4.3 Diskussion
Menge und Qualität der gesundheitsökonomischen Evidenz

Für Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit liegen zu den insgesamt sechs Verfahrensgruppen nur sehr wenig belastbare Daten vor. Daraus ergibt sich, dass auch zu gesundheitsökonomischen Folgen des Technologieeinsatzes Informationen in nur sehr begrenztem Umfang verfügbar sein können. Insgesamt werden nur fünf gesundheitsökonomische Studien gefunden (zwei zur Chemonukleolyse, zwei zur APLD und eine zu einem endoskopischen Verfahren).

Die Qualitätsbewertung anhand der Kriterienkataloge der GSWG-TAHC ergibt erhebliche methodische sowie inhaltliche Defizite in den Transparenz- und den Qualitätsanforderungen. Teilweise sind die Mängel durch das Fehlen von belastbaren Effektivitätsdaten und das dadurch eingeschränkte Spektrum an analytischen Methoden erklärbar. Hierzu gehören vor allem Defizite bei der Beschreibung der qualitativen und der quantitativen Gesundheitseffekte sowie bei der Wahl des zeitlichen Rahmens für die Analysen. Lediglich in einer Arbeit [21] wird ein gesundheitsökonomisches Modell konstruiert, in dem eine Abschätzung der Kosteneffektivität über einen mittelfristigen Zeitraum versucht wird. Andere Mängel liegen in der Konzeption und in der Durchführung der Analysen begründet. Hier stehen intransparente sowie grobe Erhebungen von Kostendeterminanten und Kosten im Vordergrund. Damit wird die Prüfung der Übertragbarkeit der Kostenangaben auf andere Versorgungssysteme unmöglich. Das größte Defizit zu den Anforderungen der Transparenz- und Qualitätskataloge besteht in den kaum vorhandenen Maßnahmen zum Umgang mit Unsicherheiten in den Analysen und in der eher oberflächlichen Diskussion der Aussagekraft der ermittelten Ergebnisse.

Inhaltlich sind in erster Linie Probleme bei der Wahl der Datengrundlage für die gesundheitsökonomischen Bewertungen (Effektivitätsdaten, Kostendaten) und bei der Wahl der Vergleichsmethode (offene Diskektomie statt Mikrodiskektomie) erkennbar.

Die Relevanz der publizierten gesundheitsökonomischen Analysen für einen Entscheidungskontext im deutschen Versorgungssystem reduziert sich weiter durch die Tatsache, dass die Chemonukleolyse und die APLD in Deutschland kaum noch eingesetzt werden [40], das MED®-Verfahren, das den Kostenkalkulationen von Maiza [26] zugrunde liegt, wird in der beschriebenen Form von der Firma nicht mehr vermarktet.

Direkte und indirekte Kosten für minimal-invasive bandscheibenchirurgische Eingriffe in der Literatur

Die aus der Literatur zu entnehmenden Angaben zu direkten und indirekten Kosten minimal-invasiver bandscheibenchirurgischer Eingriffe sind aufgrund der oben beschriebenen konzeptionellen und methodischen Mängel bei ihrer Erfassung mit einer Reihe von Problemen behaftet.

Eine Aussage ist konsistent den wenigen verfügbaren Publikationen zu entnehmen: Die direkten medizinischen Kosten für die minimal-invasiven Verfahren Chemonukleolyse und APLD scheinen niedriger zu sein als für die Standardoperationen. Im Fall der perkutanen endoskopisch unterstützten Diskektomie tritt dieser Effekt erst auf, wenn Krankenhausverweiltage in den Analysen berücksichtigt werden. (Diese Aussage beruht allerdings nur auf den Daten einer, anhand der spezifischen Bedingungen eines Krankenhausverbunds erstellten Kostenminimierungsanalyse.)

Eine differenzierte, auch quantitative Interpretation der Ergebnisse ökonomischer Analysen wird durch folgende Faktoren verhindert:

  • Zum Teil werden Angaben von Pauschalen (DRG-bezogene Kostenerstattungen (DRG = Diagnosis related groups) ohne Erläuterung des zugrunde liegenden Mengengerüsts gemacht.
  • Zum Teil wird die Erhebung von Operationskosten berichtet ohne Dokumentation eines Mengen- oder Preisgerüsts.
  • Fehlende bzw. veraltete Bezugsjahre für Kostenangaben und unterschiedliche Währungen verhindern Umrechnungen und den Vergleich von Kostendaten.

Direkte nicht-medizinische und indirekte Kosten sind nicht Gegenstand der bewerteten Analysen.

Zu vier der zu bewertenden Technologien (manuelle perkutane Nukleotomie, Laserdiskektomie, endoskopisch unterstützte Diskektomie mit posterolateralem Zugang, Laserforaminoplastie) werden in der Literatur keine ökonomischen Analysen gefunden. Für diese Verfahren soll im Rahmen unserer Bewertung die Beschreibung eines Mengengerüsts für anfallende Kosten aus Fallseriendaten versucht werden.

Die Analyse von 26 seit 1998 publizierten Fallserien ergibt, dass in den Publikationen nur wenig verwertbare Angaben für ein ökonomisches Mengengerüst enthalten sind. Sie weisen eine so große Spannweite auf, dass keine übergreifende Aussage für die Verfahrensgruppen ableitbar ist.

Damit stehen aus der veröffentlichten Literatur keine verwertbaren Angaben zu den Kosten minimal-invasiver bandscheibenchirurgischer Eingriffe zur Verfügung.

Kosteneffektivität minimal-invasiver bandscheibenchirurgischer Eingriffe in der Literatur

Kosteneffektivitätsschätzungen liegen in der Literatur nur für zwei der sechs zu bewertenden Verfahrensgruppen vor, die APLD und die Chemonukleolyse.

- APLD

Zwei gesundheitsökonomische Analysen kommen zu grundsätzlich unterschiedlichen Ergebnissen, eine Arbeit [8] favorisiert die APLD als das eindeutig kosteneffektivere Verfahren, die andere [41] die Mikrodiskektomie. Die Unterschiede beruhen in erster Linie auf den differenten Effektivitätsannahmen von 29% versus 66% für die APLD.

Dabei ist festzuhalten, dass die Daten für die günstigere Effektivitätsannahme zwei Fallserien entnommen werden, die Kalkulationen mit den ungünstigen Erfolgsannahmen auf den Ergebnissen einer RCT beruht - der einzigen, die zu dieser Fragestellung bisher publiziert wird. Auch die Kostenannahmen in den beiden ökonomischen Analysen tragen zu den konträren Resultaten bei. Dullerud und seine Mitarbeiter geben die Kosten für die konventionelle Diskektomie als DRG-Pauschale an und berechnen die reinen Operationskosten für die APLD aus eigenen Erhebungen - daraus folgt zwangsläufig, bei angenommenen hohen Erfolgsraten der APLD, eine verzerrte Schätzung zu Ungunsten des konventionellen Verfahrens. Die Kostenschätzung von Stevenson et al. ist möglicherweise, bei Annahme eines hohen Bedarfs an Nachoperationen in der APLD-Gruppe, durch hohe geschätzte Kosten für den Zweiteingriff zu Ungunsten der APLD verzerrt.

Obwohl die Analyse von Stevenson [41] aus methodischer Sicht die eher belastbaren Ergebnisse bietet, kann sie keine Basis für eine Einschätzung der gesundheitsökonomischen Konsequenzen des APLD-Einsatzes in Deutschland liefern. Einerseits ist die Übertragbarkeit der zugrunde liegenden klinischen Resultate nicht einschätzbar, andererseits sind die Kostenkalkulationen intransparent dokumentiert, so dass eine Bewertung ihrer Vergleichbarkeit mit im deutschen System anfallenden Kosten nicht möglich ist.

- Chemonukleolyse

Die Kosteneffektivität der Chemonukleolyse im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff ist Gegenstand von zwei in den 90er Jahren publizierten ökonomischen Analysen. Trotz konzeptioneller und inhaltlicher Unterschiede kommen beide zu der Kernaussage, dass die Chemonukleolyse, auch mit der Option der konventionellen Nachoperation von Therapieversagern, die kostengünstigere Therapieoption gegenüber dem primären konventionellen Eingriff ist (vergl. Abschnitt "Chemonukleolyse"). Beide Arbeiten weisen allerdings methodische und inhaltliche Probleme auf, die die Validität der Kernaussagen gefährden. Hierzu gehören: die Verwendung der offenen Diskektomie als Vergleichsintervention, die Heterogenität der eingeschlossenen Patientenklientel sowie eine intransparente Generierung von Kostendaten. Im gesundheitsökonomischen Modell ist der prinzipiell benigne Verlauf einer Bandscheibenerkrankung auch nach primärem Therapieversagen nicht abgebildet.

Zusammenfassend lässt sich feststellen, dass methodische und inhaltliche Probleme bei beiden gesundheitsökonomischen Analysen die Validität der Ergebnisse beeinträchtigen, wobei die Richtung der Verzerrung vermutlich eher zugunsten der Chemonukleolyse ausfällt, ihr Ausmaß ist nicht quantifizierbar. Als Entscheidungsgrundlage im bundesdeutschen Kontext sind die Dokumente damit nicht geeignet. Dies gilt vor allem vor dem Hintergrund, dass das Chymopapainpräparat in Deutschland seit 1991 nicht mehr vermarktet wird.

Kosten für die verschiedenen invasiven Behandlungsverfahren des Bandscheibenvorfalls in Deutschland

Dieser Punkt lässt sich anhand der vorliegenden publizierten Daten nicht klären. In den ökonomischen Analysen wird von keinen transparenten Mengen- und Preisgerüsten berichtet, deren Übertragbarkeit auf deutsche Verhältnisse überprüfbar wäre. Aus den Daten der analysierten Fallserien lassen sich ebenfalls keine verallgemeinerbaren Angaben zur Konstruktion eines Mengengerüsts ableiten.

Deutsche Veröffentlichungen mit detaillierten Kostenangaben zu den bandscheibenchirurgischen Eingriffen werden im Rahmen der Literaturrecherchen nicht gefunden. Die Durchführung eigener Erhebungen zum Standardverfahren als auch zu den sechs bewerteten Verfahrensgruppen ist einerseits bei vorgegebenem Projektumfang nicht leistbar, andererseits hat sich für solche Daten die Frage nach der Verallgemeinerbarkeit gestellt. Die Rahmenbedingungen für den Verfahrenseinsatz sind, wie insbesondere aus den Fallserienpublikationen zu entnehmen ist, sehr heterogen. Dabei beeinflussen die Erfahrung des Operateurs, die vorhandene Geräteausstattung, bestehende Fachabteilungen, das Setting (ambulanter vs. stationärer Eingriff), unterschiedliche Narkosetechniken, Besonderheiten der Patientenklientel sowie verschiedene Vorbereitung, Begleittherapie und Nachsorge die Kostendeterminanten in einem Maß, das letztendlich nur eine Aussage über die jeweilige spezifische Erhebungssituation gemacht werden kann.

In den Gebührenkatalogen GOÄ (Gebührenordnung für Ärzte) und EBM2000plus (EBM = Einheitlicher Bewertungsmaßstab) werden unterschiedliche Punktwerte für offene und minimal-invasive bandscheibenchirurgische Eingriffe vergeben (vergl. Abschnitt "Hintergrund" der ökonomischen Betrachtung). Dabei beträgt die Differenz zwischen offenen und endoskopisch unterstützten Verfahren bzw. Eingriffen 80 Punkte (1.480 vs. 1.400 Punkte), für die Chemonukleolyse werden 600 Punkte abgerechnet. Im EBMplus beträgt die Differenz zwischen offenem Verfahren und endoskopischen bzw. perkutanen Verfahren etwa 23% (8.500 vs. 6.570 Punkte). Die Chemonukleolyse wird im EBM2000plus nicht separat geführt.

Für die DRG-basierte Abrechnung stehen OPS-Kodes (OPS = Operationen- und Prozedurenschlüssel) für offene und für perkutane Verfahren mit oder ohne Endoskopie zur Verfügung. Für die Anwendung mikrochirurgischer Technik oder Lasertechnologie sind Zusatzkodes anzugeben. Derzeit wirkt sich die Angabe der unterschiedlichen Prozedurenkodes (noch) nicht auf die DRG-basierte Vergütung aus. Ab 2005 ist ein gesonderter OPS-Kode für Laserdiskusdekompression, Koblation und Chemonukleolyse vorgesehen.

Forschungsbedarf

Eine eigenständige Formulierung von gesundheitsökonomischem Forschungsbedarf macht wenig Sinn, solange keine valide Informationsbasis zur Wirksamkeit der Verfahren im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff vorliegt. Nur auf der Grundlage belastbarer Wirksamkeitsdaten lässt sich eine Aussage zur Kostenwirksamkeit machen, die als Basis für informierte Entscheidungen für oder gegen die Anwendung der Verfahren im Versorgungssystem dienen kann. In der "Medizinischen Bewertung" wird die Notwendigkeit zur Durchführung von RCT betont sowie die Installation eines systematischen Monitoringverfahrens zur Dokumentation von Patientencharakteristika, Prozessdaten der Eingriffe und deren Ergebnisse vorgeschlagen. In beide Evaluationsmodelle lassen sich ökonomische Datenerfassungen integrieren.

5. Gemeinsame Schlussfolgerungen

Die Schlussfolgerungen, die aus den Ergebnissen der vorliegenden Bewertung gezogen werden müssen, sind in ihren Einzelheiten spezifisch für die bewerteten Verfahren(sgruppen), haben aber auch exemplarischen Charakter für andere Praxisfelder, in denen Ergebnisoptimierung durch technologische Weiterentwicklung und Indikationsaufweitung versucht wird (vergl. z.B. Hüftgelenkendoprothetik [24])

1.
Die wissenschaftliche Datengrundlage, auf der Aussagen zur Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit der im Rahmen der vorliegenden Bewertung betrachteten minimal-invasiven Operationsverfahren (Chemonukleolyse, APLD, manuelle perkutane Nukleotomie, Lasernukleotomie (-diskotomie) und endoskopisch unterstützte perkutane Verfahren (inkl. PELD und ELF)) zur Behandlung des lumbalen Bandscheibenvorfalls gemacht werden können, ist wenig belastbar.
Das einzige Verfahren, dessen Wirksamkeit im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff (offene Diskektomie, Mikrodiskektomie) und im Vergleich zu fortgeführter konservativer Behandlung auf der Grundlage von Ergebnissen mehrerer RCT beurteilbar ist, ist die Chemonukleolyse. Informationen zu Komplikationsraten des Verfahrens stammen aus Anwendungsbeobachtungen, die mehrere zehntausend behandelte Patienten umfassen. Die Wirksamkeits- und Sicherheitsdaten lassen einen Stellenwert der Chemonukleolyse als intermediäre Behandlungsoption zwischen Mikrodiskektomie und konservativem Vorgehen vermuten. Daten, die eine Kosten-Nutzen-Abwägung der minimal-invasiven Behandlungsoptionen im Vergleich zu den Standardverfahren erlauben, liegen derzeit nicht vor.
Die Wirksamkeit endoskopisch unterstützter Eingriffe mit posterolateralem, transforaminalem Zugang zur Bandscheibe wird ebenfalls in zwei kleinen RCTs untersucht. Die Ergebnisse weisen auf eine dem Standardeingriff vergleichbare klinische Wirksamkeit und möglicherweise günstigere sozialmedizinische Ergebnisse hin (schnellere Rückkehr an den Arbeitsplatz). Ihre Gültigkeit für den heutigen Behandlungskontext ist, angesichts der permanenten Weiterentwicklung der Technologien und einer deutlichen Aufweitung der Indikationsstellung, jedoch fraglich.
Die APLD weist in einer einzigen RCT im Vergleich zur Mikrosdiskektomie deutlich schlechtere Ergebnisse auf.
Alle übrigen Informationen zur Wirksamkeit und zur Sicherheit der Verfahren stammen aus Fallserien, deren Ergebnisse nicht verallgemeinerbar und nicht untereinander vergleichbar sind.
Im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff ist, mit Ausnahme der Chemonukleolyse, der Status aller übrigen im Rahmen der vorliegenden Beurteilung bewerteten Verfahren als fortdauernd experimentell einzustufen. Eine belastbare Datengrundlage, die eine Einsatzempfehlung für die Verfahren in der Routineversorgung rechtfertigte, existiert derzeit nicht.
2.
Die belastbare Datengrundlage lässt sich nur durch weitere Forschung schaffen. Dabei werden zwei Arten von Informationen benötigt:
a) Valide Daten zur Beurteilung der Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit (als Grundlage für die Nutzenbewertung) der minimal-invasiven Verfahren im Vergleich zum Standardeingriff bzw. im Vergleich zu konservativen Therapieoptionen. Diese sind nur durch RCT zu erhalten. Dabei wird die Forderung nach RCT an ausgewählten Patientengruppen, unter realistischen Kontrollbedingungen, über einen adäquaten Zeitraum und mit validen Zielgrößen nicht nur von außen, unter dem Eindruck von Entscheidungsunsicherheit, an die Professionen herangetragen, sondern wird auch aus dem wissenschaftlichen Umfeld der Wirbelsäulenchirurgie selbst formuliert [44], [43], [2], [27]. Auch hier wird gefordert, die Einführung einer neuen Methode in die Praxis an Evaluationsbedingungen, im Idealfall an die Durchführung einer (randomisierten) kontrollierten Studie anzubinden. Bei der Durchführung von RCT sollen für gesundheitsökonomische Auswertungen neben klinischen Zielgrößen auch sozialmedizinische Parameter und Lebensqualität erhoben sowie Kostendaten erfasst werden.
b) Informationen, die den Nutzen der Verfahren unter Alltagsbedingungen, außerhalb des Kontexts einer klinischen Studie belegen und darüber hinaus das Potential haben, unerwartete Risiken zu entdecken, bzw. Hinweise zur Verfeinerung der Indikationsstellung, für sinnvolle Begleitmaßnahmen oder günstige Kontextbedingungen aufzuzeigen. In Skandinavien hat sich hierzu das Führen von Qualitätsregistern bewährt. Sie können einerseits als Qualitätsförderungsinstrument genutzt werden und andererseits Daten für wissenschaftliche Auswertungen liefern, auf deren Basis das Potential einer Technologie zielführender umgesetzt werden kann.
3.
Im Bereich der GKV nehmen die minimal-invasiven, alternativ zur Mikrodiskektomie einsetzbaren Operationsverfahren noch keinen hohen Stellenwert ein - der Anteil an allen bandscheibenchirurgischen Eingriffen beträgt 2003 etwa 5%, seit 2000 ist jedoch ein kontinuierlicher Anstieg der Häufigkeit zu beobachten. Beispiele anderer innovativer Operationsverfahren (z.B. roboter-unterstützte Hüftgelenkimplantation) lassen vermuten, dass sich dieser Trend fortsetzen wird, vor allem auch vor dem Hintergrund, dass für die Einführung neuer Behandlungsverfahren im Krankenhaus kein gesetzlicher Erlaubnisvorbehalt existiert. Als Voraussetzung für eine Kostenübernahme durch die GKV besteht angesichts der unklaren Evidenzlage die Möglichkeit, durch den Bundesausschuss prüfen zu lassen, inwieweit Nutzen, Notwendigkeit und Wirtschaftlichkeit der genannten Verfahren den gesetzlichen Anforderungen entsprechen. Dabei sollten vor allem auch die gesetzlichen Möglichkeiten zur Zulassung einer Leistung unter adäquaten Evaluationsbedingungen geprüft werden (nach dem Beispiel der Modellvorhaben im ambulanten Bereich). Als Beispiel könnte die Entscheidung aus Großbritannien dienen. Nach Bewertung der Evidenzlage durch NICE 2003 [31], [30] können in England aus dem Bereich der minimal-invasiven Bandscheibeneingriffe die Laserdiskusdekompression und die Laserforaminoplastie unter Evaluationsbedingungen zulasten des NHS erbracht werden.
Voraussetzung ist, dass die Patienten über den experimentellen Status der Technologie aufgeklärt werden und ihre informierte Zustimmung dokumentiert wird.Gleiches wäre im Prinzip auch für den Bereich der PKV bzw. für die Erbringung der Leistungen als "Individuelle Gesundheitsleistung" zu fordern, wobei für diese Bereiche allerdings keine gesetzliche Bindung der Leistungen (vergleichbar mit dem SGB V) an nachgewiesenen Nutzen, Notwendigkeit und Wirtschaftlichkeit existiert.

References

1.
Becker A, Chenot JF, Niebling W, Kochen MM. Leitlinie "Kreuzschmerzen". Evidenzbasierte Leitlinie der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Allgemeinmedizin und Familienmedizin. 2003.
2.
Boden, SD. An AOA critical issue. Disc replacements This time will we really cure low back and neck pain? J Bone Joint Surg. 2004;86:Nr. A, 411-22.
3.
Bosacco SJ, Bosacco DN, Berman AT, Cordover A, Levenberg RJ, Stellabotte J. Functional results of percutaneous laser discectomy. Am J Orthop. 1996;25:825-8.
4.
Boult M, Fraser RD, Jones N, Osti O, Dohrmann P, Donnelly P, Liddell J, Maddern GJ. Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy. Aust N Z J Surg. 2000;70:475-9.
5.
Chatterjee S, Foy PM, Findlay GF. Report of a controlled clinical trial comparing automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy and microdiscectomy in the treatment of contained lumbar disc herniation. Spine. 1995.20(6):734-8.
6.
Crawshaw C, Frazer AM, Merriam WF, Mulholland RC, Webb JK. A comparison of surgery and chemonucleolysis in the treatment of sciatica. A prospective randomized trial. Spine. 1984;9(2):195-8.
7.
Dabezies EJ, Langford K, Morris J, Shields CB, Wilkinson HA. Safety and efficacy of chymopapain (Discase) in the treatment of sciatica due to a herniated nucleus pulposus Results of a randomised double blind study. Spine. 1988;13:561-5.
8.
Dullerud R, Lie H, Magnaes B, Meisel J. Cost-effectiveness of percutaneous automated lumbar nucleotomy. Comparison with traditional macro-procedure discectomy. Interventional Neuroradiology. 1999;5(1):35-42.
9.
Ejeskar A, Nachemson A, Herberts P, Lysell E, Andersson G, Irstam L, Peterson LE. Surgery versus chemonucleolysis for herniated lumbar discs. A prospective study with random assignment. Clin Orthop. 1983;174:236-42.
10.
Feldman J, Menkes CJ, Pallardy G. Double-blind study of the treatment of disc lumbosciatica by chemonucleolysis. Etude en double-aveugle du traitement de la lombosciatique discale par chimionucleolyse. Rev Rhum Mal Osteoartic. 1986;53:147-52.
11.
Fraser RD. Chymopapain for the treatment of intervertebral disc herniation. A preliminary report of double-blind study. Spine. 1982;7:608-12.
12.
Gibson JNA, Grant IC, Waddell G. Surgery for lumbar disc prolapse. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;1.
13.
Gibson, JN, Grant IC, Waddell G. The Cochrane review of surgery for lumbar disc prolapse and degenerative lumbar spondylosis. Spine. 1999;24(17):1820-32.
14.
Haines SJ, Jordan N, Boen JR, Nyman JA, Oldridge NB, Lindgren BR. Discectomy strategies for lumbar disc herniation: results of the LAPDOG trial. J Clin Neurosci. 2002;9(4):411-7.
15.
Hermantin FU, Peters T, Quartararo L, Kambin P. A prospective, randomized study comparing the results of open discectomy with those of video-assisted arthroscopic microdiscectomy. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1999;81(7):958-65.
16.
Hoffman RM, Wheeler KJ, Deyo RA. Surgery for herniated lumbar discs: a literature synthesis. J Gen Int Med. 1993;8:487-96.
17.
Javid MJ, Nordby EJ, Ford LT. Safety and efficacy of chymopapain (chymodiactin) in herniated nucleos pulposus with sciatica. JAMA. 1983;249:2489-94.
18.
Javid MJ. Chemonucleolysis versus laminectomy. A cohort comparison of effectiveness and charges. Spine. 1995;20(18):2016-22.
19.
Kambin P. Arthroscopic microdiscectomy. Anthroscopy. 1992;8(3):287-95.
20.
Knight MT, Ellison DR, Goswami A, Hillier VF. Review of safety in endoscopic laser foraminoplasty for the management of back pain. J Clin Laser Med Surg. 2001;19(3):147-57.
21.
Launois R, Henry B, Marty JR, Gersberg M, Lassale C, Benoist M, Goehrs JM. Chemonucleolysis versus surgical discectomy for sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation. A cost and quality-of-life evaluation. Pharmacoeconomics. 1994;6(5):453-63.
22.
Lavignolle B, Vital JM, Baulny D, Grenier F, Castagnera L. Comparative study of surgery and chemonucleolysis in the treatment of sciatica caused by a herniated disc. Orthop Belg. 1987;53(2):244-9.
23.
Lee SH, Lee SJ, Park KH, Lee IM, Sung KH, Kim JS, Yoon SY. [Comparison of percutaneous manual and endoscopic laser diskectomy with chemonucleolysis and automated nucleotomy]. Orthopade. 1996;25(1):49-55.
24.
Lühmann D, Hauschild B, Raspe H. Hüftgelenkendoprothetik bei Osteoarthrose. Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft; 2000.
25.
Lühmann D, Raspe H. Operative Eingriffe an der lumbalen Wirbelsäule bei bandscheibenbedingten Rücken- und Beinschmerzen. Eine Verfahrensbewertung. Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft; 2003.
26.
Maiza D, Baffert S, Fay AF, Charpentier E, Jakobi-Rodrigues N, Féry-Lemonnier E. Microdiscectomie par voie Endoscopique. Assistence Publique Hopiteaux de Paris; (AP-HP): 1999.
27.
Malchau H. Editorial comments introducing new technology: A stepwise algorithm. Spine. 2000;25:285.
28.
Mayer HM, Brock M. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy: surgical technique and preliminary results compared to microsurgical discectomy. J Neurosurg. 1993;78(2):216-25.
29.
Muralikuttan K, Hamilton A, Kernohan W, Mollan R, Adair I. A prospective randomized trial of chemonucleolysis and conventional disc surgery in single level lumbar disc herniation. Spine. 1992;17(4):381-7.
30.
NICE. Endoscopic laser foraminoplasty (overview). Hintergrunddokument zu Guidance. IPG0031; 2003.
31.
NICE. Interventional procedure overview of Laser lumbar Discectomy. Hintergrunddokument zu Guidance. IPG0027; 2003.
32.
Nordby EJ, Wright PH, Schofield SR. Safety of chemonucleolysis. Adverse effects reported in the United States, 1982-1991. Clin Orthop. 1993;293:122-34.
33.
Onik G, Maroon J, Helms C, Schweigel J, Mooney V, Kahanovitz N, Day A, Morris J, McCulloch JA, Reicher M. Automated percutaneous diskektomy: initial patient experience. Work in progress. Radiology. 1987;162:129-32.
34.
Rasmussen FO, Amundsen T, Vandvik B. Lumbale skiveprolapser og radiologisk ryggintervensjon. Hva sier randomiserte kontrollerte studier? Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998;118(16):2478-80.
35.
Raspe H. Kohlmann: Die aktuelle Rückenschmerzepidemie. Therapeutische Umschau. 1994;51(6):367-74.
36.
Schick U, Döhnert J, Richter A, König A, Vitzthum HE. Microendoscopic lumbar discectomy versus open surgery: an intraoperative EMG study. Eur Spine J. 2002;11(1):20-6.
37.
Schmid UD. Microsurgery of lumbar disk herniations - Superior results of microsurgery, compared with standard and percutaneous techniques, and review of the literature. Nervenarzt. 2000;71(4):265-74.
38.
Schreiber A, Suezawa Y, Leu H. Does percutaneous nucleotomy with discoscopy replace conventional discectomy? Eight years of experience and results in treatment of herniated lumbar disc. Clin Orthop. 1989;238:35-42.
39.
Schwetschenau PR, Ramirez A, Johnston J, Barnes E, Wiggs C, Martins AN. Double-blind evaluation of intradiscal chymopapain for herniated lumbar disc: Early results. J Neurosurg. 1976;45:622-7.
40.
Steffen R, von Bremen-Kühne R, Wittenberg RH. Chemonukleolyse. Kap. 9. In: Breitenfelder J, Haaker R. Der lumbale Bandscheibenvorfall. Darmstadt; 2003. p. 71-77.
41.
Stevenson R, McCabe C, Findlay A. An economic evaluation of a clinical trial to compare automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy with microdiscectomy in the treatment of contained lumbar disc herniation. Spine. 1995;20(6):739-42.
42.
Van Alphen HA, Braakman R, Bezemer PD, Broere G, Berfelo MW. Chemonucleolysis versus discectomy: a randomized multicenter trial. J Neurosurg. 1989;70(6):869-75.
43.
Weinstein JN. Emerging technology in spine. Should we rethink the past or move forward in spite of the past. Spine. 2003;28(15):1.
44.
Weinstein JN. The tortoise and the hare. Is there a place in spine surgery for randomized trials? Spine. 1999;24(23):2548-49.