gms | German Medical Science

23rd Annual Meeting of the German Retina Society

German Retina Society

24.09. - 25.09.2010, Freiburg

Intraoperative OCT (iOCT) for the posterior segment surgery

Meeting Abstract

  • Maya Müller - Department of Ophthalmology, University of Lübeck, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck; 2Institute of Biomedical Optics, University of Lübeck
  • P. Steven - Department of Ophthalmology, University of Lübeck, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck; 2Institute of Biomedical Optics, University of Lübeck
  • E. Lankenau - Institute of Biomedical Optics, University of Lübeck; OPTOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES GmbH, Lübeck
  • M. Krug - Institute of Biomedical Optics, University of Lübeck
  • E. Acidereli - Institute of Biomedical Optics, University of Lübeck
  • S. Oelkers - Moeller-Wedel GmbH, Wedel
  • R. Birngruber - Institute of Biomedical Optics, University of Lübeck
  • S. Grisanti - Department of Ophthalmology, University of Lübeck, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck; 2Institute of Biomedical Optics, University of Lübeck
  • G. Hüttmann - Institute of Biomedical Optics, University of Lübeck
  • Lübecker OCT Studiengruppe

German Retina Society. 23rd Annual Conference of the German Retina Society. Freiburg i. Br., 24.-25.09.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10rg64

DOI: 10.3205/10rg64, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10rg645

This is the translated version of the article.
The original version can be found at: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/rg2010/10rg64.shtml

Published: September 21, 2010

© 2010 Müller et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Purpose: To evaluate a new surgical microscope-mounted OCT-Camera for intraoperative diagnosis and assistance.

Patients and methods: With a newly developed OCT camera (OPTOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES, Lübeck, Germany in cooperation with MOELLER-WEDEL, Wedel), which is mounted on a surgical microscope (Hi-R 900, MOELLER-WEDEL) with external display (MEDIS, MOELLER-WEDEL), 42 patients were imaged during routine posterior segment surgery. A non-contact 90D lens (EIBOS, MOELLER-WEDEL) or contact vitrectomy flat lens (DORC; Zuidland, Niederlande) were used. The OCT camera had a central wavelength of 840 nm, a depth of view of 5.2 mm and a zoom dependant field of view of 5 mm at maximal zoom. Acquisition speed was 10,000 A-scans/s. Image stacks, en-face OCT and 2D-real time imaging with additional volume scans were recorded.

Results: Intraoperative OCT (iOCT) can image the posterior segment with spectral domain quality. Retinal membrane structures were seen in real-time or as 2D or 3D reconstruction. Pathologies such as epiretinal membranes, macular holes and vitreomacular tractions could be visualized in high-resolution prior and during surgical removal. Surgical instruments could be localized during manipulation.

Conclusion: iOCT enables intraoperative high-resolution OCT imaging of posterior segment surgery. It provides a depth-resolved view of delicate tissue structures and enables an intraoperative control of the intended therapy. iOCT may become a new tool in eye surgery.

Supported by Medical Technology Grant, University of Luebeck.