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80th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

20.05. - 24.05.2009, Rostock

Multiple Cherry Haemangiomata in the Head and Neck region

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author Christiane Albrecht - HNO-Klinik Klinikum Bad Hersfeld, Bad Hersfeld, Germany
  • Henrik Losenhausen - HNO-Klinik Klinikum Bad Hersfeld, Bad Hersfeld, Germany
  • Peter R. Issing - HNO-Klinik Klinikum Bad Hersfeld, Bad Hersfeld, Germany

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 80th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Rostock, 20.-24.05.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. Doc09hno054

DOI: 10.3205/09hno054, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09hno0541

Published: July 22, 2009

© 2009 Albrecht et al.
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Outline

Text

Introduction: Cherry Haemangiomata (CH) are benign aggregations of dilated capillaries and venules in the superficial dermis. The lesions begin as erythroid macules which develop to papules.

There is no sex prevalence. In the literature cases are reported with multiple lesions after sulphur, mustard gas or bromide exposition. Illness accumulations were described in old people's homes which suggest the suspicion on contagiosity. The pathogenesis of the CH remains still unclear. Neither genetic nor angiogenetic factors could be found yet.

Most CH originate at the adult's age and are localised above all in the trunk and upper extremity. Lesions in the head neck area are rarely described in the literature.

Case report: A 71-year-old patient presented in our outpatient clinic because of a parotideal swelling on the right side. Aside she showed multiple haemangiomata in the facial and neck area which have been, in accordance to the patient, progressive in number and size for approximately 5 years. A performed biopsy revealed a partial thrombosis of a dermal cavernous haemangioma.

The otorhinolaryngeal examination demonstrated a painful space-consuming lesion in the right parotideal region, which was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics under the assumption of an infected intraparotideal cyst.

Conclusion: CH are regarded as a frequent dermatosis. In the literature prevalence up to 75% in 70-year-old patients is reported. Nevertheless, multiple lesions in the facial and cervical area, like in our case, are rare.


References

1.
Le Boit P, Burg G, Weedon D, Sarasin A. World Health Organisation Classification of tumors. Pathology & Genetics, Skin tumors, Vascular tumors. Cherry haemangioma. p.233-4
2.
Pereira JM. Cherry haemangioma in the scalp. Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia. 2004;79(1).