gms | German Medical Science

102. Jahrestagung der DOG

Deutsche Ophthalmologische Gesellschaft e. V.

23. bis 26.09.2004, Berlin

Diabetic retinopathy in Kenya: challenges and perspectives for VISION 2020: results from the Diabetic Retinopathy Project at the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Nairobi, Kenya

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author K. H. M. Kollmann - Department of Ophthalmology, Nairobi, Kenia
  • H. S. Adala - Department of Ophthalmology, Nairobi, Kenia
  • H. C. Gäckle - Department of Ophthalmology, Nairobi, Kenia
  • P. V. Choksey - Department of Ophthalmology, Nairobi, Kenia
  • M. M. Kariuki - Department of Ophthalmology, Nairobi, Kenia
  • S. Gichuhi - Department of Ophthalmology, Nairobi, Kenia
  • A. K. Githeko - Department of Ophthalmology, Nairobi, Kenia
  • H. E. Nkumbe - Department of Ophthalmology, Nairobi, Kenia

Evidenzbasierte Medizin - Anspruch und Wirklichkeit. 102. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Ophthalmologischen Gesellschaft. Berlin, 23.-26.09.2004. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2004. Doc04dogSO.08.06

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dog2004/04dog487.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 22. September 2004

© 2004 Kollmann et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective

With worldwide estimated 2,5 million blind people diabetic retinopathy emerges as the 4th leading cause of avoidable blindness accounting for approximately 5% of blindness. While it is the No.1 cause of avoidable blindness for the working population in the industrialized world it is said to account for 5-10% of blindness in intermediate economies. For developing countries no sufficient data are available. However, anecdotal observation and preliminary studies indicate that it is an increasing problem.

Methods

To address the need for improved data on the magnitude and pattern of diabetic retinopathy in Kenya and to prepare adequately for this upcoming problem, in 1997 a Diabetic Retinopathy Project Kenya was initiated at the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Nairobi, initially with financial support from the Hannelore Zimmermann Foundation.

Results

In consecutive studies the situation for a major referral hospital in Nairobi and for diabetic programmes in rural Kenya where examined with the following major results (extracts):

1. Urban national referral hospital (N = 601, patients attending medical clinic for diabetics): 49.8% had diabetic retinopathy; 82% had no previous eye examination and 48.6% of DR patients needed some sort of treatment. 19.7% had blinding conditions (13.4% csME, 6.3% PDR)

2. Rural clinics / hospitals (N = 410, patients attending medical clinics for diabetics): 18.3% had diabetic retinopathy; 4.9% had blinding conditions (4.5% csME, 0.4% PDR)

3. Urban national referral hospital (N = 71, newly diagnosed diabetics attending medical clinic): 30.4% had diabetic retinopathy, 12.5% had blinding conditions (8.2 csME, 4.3 PDR)

4. Peri-urban referral hospital (N = 50, patients attending medical clinic for diabetics): Prevalence of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (32%) and Ocular Hypertension (14%) where found to be significantly higher in black Kenyan diabetics than reported from similar studies in Caucasians. Most of the patients with POAG or OH did not show any DR.

Conclusions

These data provide evidence of diabetic retinopathy as an emerging problem for East Africa. The results, together with other data from the Diabetic Retinopathy Project, will be discussed with the aim to assist in developing appropriate VISION 2020 strategies for Kenya and the region.