gms | German Medical Science

57. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V. (DGNC)
Joint Meeting mit der Japanischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

11. bis 14.05.2006, Essen

Curved planar reformation images for identification of the central sulcus of affected hemispheres: Comparison with functional magnetic resonance imaging

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author H. Nishimoto - Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan
  • T. Inoue - Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan
  • M. Sasaki - Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan
  • Y. Kanbara - High-field MRI institute Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan
  • H. Arai - Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan
  • T. Beppu - Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan
  • K. Ogasawara - Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan
  • A. Ogawa - Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Japan

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Japanische Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 57. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC), Joint Meeting mit der Japanischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Essen, 11.-14.05.2006. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2006. DocP 04.54

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgnc2006/06dgnc271.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 8. Mai 2006

© 2006 Nishimoto et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: Curved planar reformation (CPR) is a new technique for visualizing three dimensional MR imaging. This technique helps in identifying anatomic structures by demonstrating the whole gyral and sulcal pattern of the brain at once. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of CPR in identification of the central sulcus on affected hemispheres.

Methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was studied in 34 patients with intracranial lesion adjacent to the central sulcus. fMRI was performed with a 3.0 Tesla scanner during repetitive opening and closing of each hand. The central sulcus was defined as the nearest sulcus to the highest activation spots. Three-dimensional MR imaging data sets were processed using a CPR method to create brain surface reformatted images. We accepted five anatomical features widely spreading in clinical usage to identify the central sulcus: 1, termination of the superior frontal sulcus in the precentral sulcus; 2, intraparietal sulcus joins the postcentral sulcus; 3, precentral gyrus is thicker than postcentral gyrus; 4, the inverted omega-shape of the precentral gyrus and 5, the central sulcus is isolated sulcus.

Results: The central sulci identified by fMRI coincided with those identified by CPR in 34 hemispheres of patients. Applicability of each five sign is 61.8, 73.5, 58.8, 50.0 and 67.6%, respectively.

Conclusions: CPR method will be recommended for identification of the central sulcus.