gms | German Medical Science

128. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

03.05. - 06.05.2011, München

Laser printing of cells into 3D scaffolds

Meeting Abstract

  • Mathias Wilhelmi - Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Herz-, Thorax-, Transplantations- und Gefäßchirurgie, Hannover
  • Michael Pflaum - Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Herz-, Thorax-, Transplantations- und Gefäßchirurgie, Hannover
  • Martin Gruene - Laserzentrum Hannover e.V., Hannover
  • Aleksandr Ovsianikov - Laserzentrum Hannover e.V., Hannover
  • Boris Chichkov - Laserzentrum Hannover e.V., Hannover
  • Axel Haverich - Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Herz-, Thorax-, Transplantations- und Gefäßchirurgie, Hannover

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. 128. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. München, 03.-06.05.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2011. Doc11dgch573

DOI: 10.3205/11dgch573, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11dgch5730

Veröffentlicht: 20. Mai 2011

© 2011 Wilhelmi et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Introduction: Native tissues consist of several cell types which are embedded in a matrix with a distinct architecture. For the in vitro generation of a functional 3D tissue, a technique for the directed deposition of cells into predefined scaffolds is a prerequisite.

Materials and methods: Two-photon polymerization (2PP) was applied to generate a hexagonal, structured scaffold (2 mm in diameter, 200µm in height) from poly ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGda) monomers and a photoinitiator (Irgacure 369, Ciba). Using Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) droplets of a hydrogel suspension of endothelial (EC) or smooth muscle- like (SMC) cells (~20 cell/droplet) were propelled selectively into the target cylinders of the scaffold. Layer-by-layer one droplet was put on the top of another until the cylinder was completely filled. The deposition of the differently pre-stained ECs and SMCs was monitored directly after the LIFT- process by fluorescence microscopy.

Results: Fluorescence microscopic pictures, taken immediately after the LIFT procedure, confirm the selective deposition of the two cell types within the scaffold areas. The outer rim of the scaffold (separated by the white hexagon) was successfully seeded with calcein stained SMCs (green), while the inner perimeter was seeded with Tamra-5 stained ECs (red). Higher magnification pictures of the borderline show a distinct transition from ECs to SMCs.

Conclusion: By combining 2PP and LIFT we were able to deposit ECs and SMCs in three dimensions. This represents a first step towards the reproduction of the matrix architecture and cell arrangement observed in native arteries.