gms | German Medical Science

80th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

20.05. - 24.05.2009, Rostock

Computer-aided 3D visualization in oto-rhino-laryngology

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author Attila Nagy - HNO Klinik, Szeged, Hungary
  • Attila Tanács - University of Szeged, Department of Image Processing and Computer Graphics, Szeged, Hungary
  • András Czesznak - Sun Microsystems Hungary Ltd, Budapest, Hungary
  • György Smehák - University of Szeged, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Szeged, Hungary
  • Ferenc Tóth - University of Szeged, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Szeged, Hungary
  • László Rovó - University of Szeged, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Szeged, Hungary
  • József Jóri - University of Szeged, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Szeged, Hungary
  • József Géza Kiss - University of Szeged, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Szeged, Hungary

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. 80. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. Rostock, 20.-24.05.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. Doc09hnod022

DOI: 10.3205/09hnod022, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09hnod0228

Published: April 17, 2009

© 2009 Nagy et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

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Objectives: We are looking for a method to routinely evaluate CT and MR scans obtained for patients who will undergo surgery. As all these data are presented to us on digital media, further possibilities open up on image processing, 3D reconstruction, and surgical planning. We were looking for free software to complete this task.

Methods: We evaluated the 3D Slicer software (www.slicer.org), as this tool is free to use, free to modify – if needed – has a very solid and active developer community, and it exists on multiple platforms. We used a Sun Java Workstation (2*2,8GHz AMD Opteron 250 CPUs, 4GB RAM, Nvidia Quadro FX 3000 VGA) with Solaris Express Developer Edition to port, compile, and run Slicer.

Results: We present 3D reconstructed and combined CT/MR images of one patient with an orbita-infiltrating neurofibrosarcoma, or malignant schwannoma. Were actually used these results in the preoperative evaluation of the surgical intervention. An other case is presented where we visualize the acoustic neurinoma and two subarachnoidal cysts one patient had. We also present EABR findings of the latter patient.

Conclusion: Nowadays, as computers get faster, and become much more affordable, 3D image reconstruction, computer-aided planning of surgical interventions, or even image guided therapy (IGT) may become a tool for everyday use. Software developers quickly following the rapid evolution of hardware, make us possible to use these tools to the benefit of our patients.