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7th EFSMA – European Congress of Sports Medicine, 3rd Central European Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Annual Assembly of the German and the Austrian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Austrian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

26.-29.10.2011, Salzburg, Austria

A randomized clinical study of the effects of traditional Thai massage on pain, chest expansion and shoulder range of motion among patients with scapulocostal syndrome

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Vitsarut Buttagat - Back Neck and Other Joint Pain Research Group, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
  • author Wichai Eungpinichpong - Back Neck and Other Joint Pain Research Group, Khon Kaen University and Research and Training Center for Enhancing Quality of Life of Working-Age People, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
  • author Uraiwon Chatchawan - Back Neck and Other Joint Pain Research Group, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
  • author Preeda Arayawichanon - Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand

7th EFSMA – European Congress of Sports Medicine, 3rd Central European Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Salzburg, 26.-29.10.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2011. Doc11esm033

DOI: 10.3205/11esm033, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11esm0337

Published: October 24, 2011

© 2011 Buttagat et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Objective: Scapulocostal syndrome (SCS) has been defined as a chronic musculoskeletal syndrome characterized by pain over the medial superior border of the scapula [1]. Traditional Thai massage has been used to treat patients with SCS for long time, but its efficacy has not been studied. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of TTM on pain, chest expansion and shoulder range of motion in patients with SCS.

Material/Methods: Forty-four patients (34 females and 10 males, aged 21–49 yrs) were randomly allocated to receive a 30-minutes session of either TTM or physical therapy (PT: ultrasound therapy and hot pack) for 9 sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Thai Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (Th-SFMPQ), pain frequency, chest expansion, shoulder flexion and shoulder abduction were measured before and 1 day after the treatment period.

Results: Results indicated that the TTM group showed a significant improvement in all parameters after 3 weeks of the treatments (p<0.001). However, the PT group showed a significant improvement only in the Th-SFMPQ, pain frequency and chest expansion (p<0.05). The TTM group demonstrated more improvement than the PT group in range of motion in shoulder flexion and abduction at the end of the treatments (p<0.05).

Conclusion: This study suggests that TTM is an effective intervention that can decrease pain and increase chest expansion, shoulder flexion and shoulder abduction among patients with SCS.


References

1.
Abrams B, Goodman S. Scapulocostal Syndrome. In: Waldman SD, ed. Pain Management. Volume 1. Philadelphia: Saunders; 2007.