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61st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Neurosurgery (DGNC) as part of the Neurowoche 2010
Joint Meeting with the Brazilian Society of Neurosurgery on the 20 September 2010

German Society of Neurosurgery (DGNC)

21 - 25 September 2010, Mannheim

A 3-year epidemiological study of nosocomial infections in a neurosurgery department

Meeting Abstract

  • Maryam Khaleghi Ghadiri - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Deutschland
  • Holger Nüllmann - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Deutschland
  • Johannes Wölfer - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Deutschland
  • Hansdetlef Wassmann - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Deutschland
  • Walter Stummer - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Deutschland

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 61. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) im Rahmen der Neurowoche 2010. Mannheim, 21.-25.09.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. DocP1822

DOI: 10.3205/10dgnc293, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10dgnc2938

Published: September 16, 2010

© 2010 Ghadiri et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

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Objective: The characteristics of nosocomial infections (NI) in an intermediate care unit of our neurosurgical department were studied over a 3 year period (2006–2008).

Methods: During this period, 352 patients (64.9±0.8 years old) were hospitalized in the unit with a stay longer than 48 hours (10.4± 0.2 day).

Results: The most common underlying neurosurgical pathologies were subarachnoid as well as intracranial hemorrhage and intracranial tumors. The rate of NI was 14.1%, 15.2%, and 20.4% in 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively (average 16,7%; 59 of 352 patients developed a NI). Broncho-pulmonary and urinary tract infection followed by sepsis and CNS infection were the most common types of infection. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus was the most commonly isolated pathogens (30.4% of isolates) followed by Enterococcus, E.Coli, and Enterobacter. For all the pathogens isolated, the average rate of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents was 40%. Coronary disease (64.3%) was the most common risk factor in these patients followed by previous cranial surgery and renal disorders. In addition, the incidence of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization appears to be increasing (6 in 2006, 8 in 2007, 15 in 2008, 23 in 2009). Fortunately, the effect of MRSA infection on morbidity in hospitalized neurosurgical patients remains low.

Conclusions: These data may help to guide prevention strategies and other quality improvement efforts aimed at reducing NI rates as much as possible in neurosurgery departments.