gms | German Medical Science

126. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

28.04. - 01.05.2009, München

Fresh mesothelial lesions highly attract free floating intraperitoneal colorectal tumour cells in a rat model

Meeting Abstract

  • I. Königsrainer - General, Visceral- and Transplant Surgery, Tübingen, Germany
  • D. Zieker - General, Visceral- and Transplant Surgery, Tübingen, Germany
  • S. Beckert - General, Visceral- and Transplant Surgery, Tübingen, Germany
  • C. Weyhern von - Pathology
  • S. Löb - General, Visceral- and Transplant Surgery, Tübingen, Germany
  • C. Falch - General, Visceral- and Transplant Surgery, Tübingen, Germany
  • corresponding author B.L. Brücher - General, Visceral- and Transplant Surgery, Tübingen, Germany
  • A. Königsrainer - General, Visceral- and Transplant Surgery, Tübingen, Germany
  • J. Glatzle - General, Visceral- and Transplant Surgery, Tübingen, Germany

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. 126. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. München, 28.04.-01.05.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. Doc09dgch11666

DOI: 10.3205/09dgch558, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09dgch5586

Published: April 23, 2009

© 2009 Königsrainer et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Introduction: Intraperitoneal free cancer cells are associated with a higher risk of recurrence and a poorer prognosis in colorectal surgery. Tumour recurrence may occur early after surgery. One potential mechanism is the ability of peritoneal lesions to attract tumour cells.

Material and methods: In Wag-Rija rats, the parietal peritoneum was resected on a defined area and a corresponding control area was marked with 4 sutures in the same rat. Colorectal tumor cells (CC531, 2.5x106) were injected into the abdominal cavity at the end of surgery. The abdominal wall was harvested at 6 or 9 days and tissue samples (peritonectomy and control area, n=4 each group) were resected with a punch (diameter 2cm). The specimens were evaluated for weight, macroscopic tumor growth, and histological tumor infiltration.

Results: The weight of the abdominal wall was significantly increased in the area of peritonectomy after 6 and 9 days (control vs. peritonectomy [mg]; 6 days: 804±61 vs. 1001±20*; 9 days: 1348±145 vs .2168±296*;*p<0.05). Tumor growth was significantly increased in the area of peritonectomy (control vs. peritonectomy [%]; 6 days: 11±5 vs. 64±10*; 9 days: 39±11 vs. 88±5*;*p<0.002).The tumor depth was more than 3.8 fold increased in the area of peritonectomy (control vs. peritonectomy [mm]; 6 days: 2.19±0.26 vs. 0.82±0.14*; 9 days: 1.55±0.4 vs. 5.96±1.4*;*p<0.01).

Conclusion: Peritoneal defects may play an important role in the pathogenesis of tumour implantation and might have some impact on tumour recurrence. The peritoneal damage should be kept as low as possible in patients undergoing tumour resection.