gms | German Medical Science

29. Jahrestagung der Deutschsprachigen Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Verbrennungsbehandlung (DAV 2011)

12.01. - 15.01.2011, Grindelwald, Schweiz

Heterotopic Para – Articular Ossification in a Child Following Flame Burns

Meeting Abstract

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  • C. E. Price - Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, R.S.A
  • M. Guggenheim - Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, R.S.A
  • H. Rode - Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, R.S.A

DAV 2011. 29. Jahrestagung der Deutschsprachigen Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Verbrennungsbehandlung. Grindelwald, Schweiz, 12.-15.01.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2011. Doc11dav47

DOI: 10.3205/11dav47, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11dav470

Published: June 21, 2011

© 2011 Price et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Background: Heterotopic bone formation is a rare, but well-known complication of severe burns. Pain, tenderness, joint stiffness and even permanent disability may result if this pathological ossification occurs around joints. The elbow is the most frequently involved joint in most burn case series. We present a case study of a 13 year old boy who sustained 71% TBSA flame burns. His recovery was complicated by stiffness of his elbow following the development of heterotopic ossification around the joint.

Methods: Literature review on heterotopic ossification in burns. As well as a review of the case to try and find a cause in this patient.

Results: Successful treatment following delay in diagnosis.

Conclusions: It is our hope that this case study will serve to remind the burn surgeon of this rare clinical entity and that including screening radiographs in the routine follow up of patients with restriction of joint movement may help the prompt diagnosis of heterotopic calcification, and enhance patient outcomes.