gms | German Medical Science

Annual Meeting of the German MLA (AGMB)

16.09. - 18.09.2013, Berlin

Product Review: Studies show how new generation of journals help scientists learn techniques with video

Meeting Abstract

  • JoVE – Journal of Visualized Experiments

Arbeitsgemeinschaft für medizinisches Bibliothekswesen (AGMB). Jahrestagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft für medizinisches Bibliothekswesen (AGMB). Berlin, 16.-18.09.2013. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2013. Doc13agmb14

doi: 10.3205/13agmb14, urn:nbn:de:0183-13agmb144

Published: August 13, 2013

© 2013 .
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Modern research scientists suffer from low reproducibility of experimental studies. To compound this issue, researchers face a revolving door of colleagues and students that need to learn specific laboratory techniques. Low reproducibility is due in part to the difficulty in learning techniques from the traditional text-based format of scientific journals, which do not provide an adequate description of complex research procedures. Research innovation is limited by this work force in transition and the inadequate instruction provided by traditional scientific publications.

A new generation of scientific journals employs online video to provide systematic visualization of research methods that may be used to train new researchers and to assist in reproduction of results. This presentation will feature the expansion of the scholarly video medium as well as provide first hand accounts from users of the medium.

The gold standard in scientific research has long been the reproducibility of previously published academic research. Over the past 10 years this standard has been declining. In 2011 Bayer published findings that showed a remarkable decline in the reproducibility of published academic research. They found that 62% of published academic research could not be replicated. They also found that a further 12% could only be partially replicated. Only 20% of academic literature could in fact be replicated. Now if this issue was in isolation then it could be explained as an anomaly. Instead this is as will be illustrated a growing and endemic problem across the entire academic and corporate community. Amgen discovered that 70% of research was not replicable. Dana Farber, even more at 75%. The Wall Street Journal recently said this, “Most results, including those that appear in top-flight peer-reviewed journals, can’t be reproduced.”

Modern research scientists suffer from low reproducibility of experimental studies. To compound this issue, researchers face a revolving door of colleagues and students that need to learn specific laboratory techniques. Low reproducibility is due in part to the difficulty in learning techniques from the traditional text-based format of scientific journals, which do not provide an adequate description of complex research procedures. Research innovation is limited by this work force in transition and the inadequate instruction provided by traditional scientific publications.

A new generation of scientific journals employs online video to provide systematic visualization of research methods that may be used to train new researchers and to assist in reproduction of results. This presentation will feature the expansion of the scholarly video medium as well as provide first hand accounts from users of the medium.