gms | German Medical Science

Artificial Vision — The 2nd Bonn Dialogue. The International Symposium on Visual Prosthesis

Retina Implant Foundation

19.09.2009, Bonn

Multichannel Neurotransmitter based Prosthesis

Meeting Abstract

Suche in Medline nach

  • author Raymond Iezzi - Mayo Clinic, Department of Ophthalmology, Vitreoretinal Service, Rochester, USA
  • Paul Finlayson - Mayo Clinic, Department of Ophthalmology, Vitreoretinal Service, Rochester, USA

Artificial Vision – The 2nd Bonn Dialogue. The International Symposium on Visual Prosthesis. Bonn, 19.-19.09.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. Doc09ri12

DOI: 10.3205/09ri12, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09ri124

Veröffentlicht: 30. November 2009

© 2009 Iezzi et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Most retinal prostheses in development today employ the use of electrical stimulation to modulate neuronal activity within the retina and create electrophosphenes. Fabrication of retinal prothesis electrodes and electrical stimulation chips has been made possible through decades of advances microelectronics fabrication technology. The primary mode of interneuronal communication within the retina is via neurotransmitter-ligand receptor interactions, however. These systems evolved to provide the visual system with information pathways. Retinal prostheses that employ the spatially and temporally controlled release of neurotransmitters may be able to uniquely communicate along these specialized visual sub-systems.

Our group has successfully characterized the neurotransmitter stimulation parameters required to modulate retinal ganglion cell activity in wholemount retinae of normal and retinitis pigmentosa phenotypes. Combined with computational models and methods for microfluidic manufacturing, the design and fabrication of multichannel neurotransmitter-based retinal prostheses is possible.

The purpose of this talk is to present our results with in-vitro neurotransmitter-based retinal stimulation and how these relate to the predicted models for retinal stimulation in normal and retinitis pigmentosa retinae in the context of designing a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis.