gms | German Medical Science

81. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

12.05. - 16.05.2010, Wiesbaden

Cochlear implant indications, surgical techniques and therapeutical results

Meeting Abstract

Suche in Medline nach

  • corresponding author Stan Cotulbea - Univ. Victor Babes, Dept. ENT, Timisoara, Romania
  • V. Drganescu - Univ. Victor Babes, Dept. ENT, Timisoara, Romania
  • Delia Trales - Univ. Victor Babes, Dept. ENT, Timisoara, Romania

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. 81. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. Wiesbaden, 12.-16.05.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10hnod269

DOI: 10.3205/10hnod269, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10hnod2693

Veröffentlicht: 22. April 2010

© 2010 Cotulbea et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: We present our 6 year experience in cochlear implantation. Screening, evaluation, early diagnosis, surgical treatment, and rehabilitation in children with cochlear severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss raises different problems from those encountered in adults. Our continuing concern is the improvement of early diagnosis and lowering the age of implantation.

Material and methods: 63 patients received cochlear implants between 1/2003 and 8/2009. 60 patients had prelingual (mean age 3.4 years). 3 patients postlingual hearing loss (1 Cogan’s syndrome, 2 postmeningitis). Classic technique (mastoidectomy, facial recess approach, cochleostomy) with both the large and the minimal incision was used. In children the developing skull, the thickness of the skull and the amount of blood loss have to be considered. In 21 selected cases cochlear implantation was performed through minimal incision approach and fixation using periosteal sutures.

Results: We had no major complications, such as flap necrosis with extrusion of the implant, meningitis or facial palsy. 3 patients (4.76%) showed CSF gusher intraoperatively; successful implantation have been accomplished. We encountered 2 late complications (over 1 year): cholesteatoma and a progressive device failure. In minimal incision technique, the combination of a well-formed bony well and periosteal tightening sutures created sufficient fixation to avoid device dislocation and migration.

Conclusions: The cochlear implant has radically changed the outlook for profoundly deaf adults and children. It is not possible to predict the benefit an individual will obtain from a cochlear implant, but children born deaf will have greatest benefit if they are implanted before the age of 5, and preferably by the age of 3.