gms | German Medical Science

76. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e. V.

04.05. - 08.05.2005, Erfurt

Auditory midbrain implant (AMI) – physiology and histology of acute and chronic implantations

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author Guenter Reuter - Dept. of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Hannover, Hannover
  • Alexandru-Constantin Stan - Dept. of Neuropathology, Medical University of Hannover, Hannover
  • Minoo Lenarz - Dept. of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Hannover, Hannover
  • Thomas Lenarz - Dept. of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Hannover, Hannover
  • Gerrit Paasche - Dept. of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Hannover, Hannover
  • Uta Reich - Dept. of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Hannover, Hannover

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. 76. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie e.V.. Erfurt, 04.-08.05.2005. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2005. Doc05hno555

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/hno2005/05hno030.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 22. September 2005

© 2005 Reuter et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

The inferior colliculus (IC) is a good alternative to brainstem implants implantable into the cochlear nucleus due to its good surgical accessibility and its well-known tonotopic stratification in frequency ranges. In acute experiments frequency-specific activities could be proven on the auditory cortex after electric stimulation by the AMI electrode.

AMI electrodes with and without electric coupling were implanted into the IC of six animals (one electrode each). For the animals with electrically coupled electrodes the impedance was determined after surgery for a minimum of three times a week over a period of three months and acoustically stimulated five times a week for five hours daily.

Even neonatally deafened animals react to acoustic stimuli. Stable impedances can be measured over the period examined. Scar formation in the IC has to be seen locally. Quality of scarring and stable impedances do not provide any arguments against implantation into humans.

This promising approach has to be continued and improved with more exact stereotactic implantations and modifications of electrode design.