gms | German Medical Science

G-I-N Conference 2012

Guidelines International Network

22.08 - 25.08.2012, Berlin

A standardised framework for knowledge translation linked to a national guidance initiative

Meeting Abstract

  • L. Young - Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme, NHS Education for Scotland, Dundee, UK
  • J. Clarkson - Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK
  • D. Stirling - Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme, NHS Education for Scotland, Dundee, UK
  • P. Elouafkaoui - Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK
  • A. Templeton - Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK
  • S. Rutherford - Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme, NHS Education for Scotland, Dundee, UK
  • C. Ramsay - Health Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK
  • T. Methodology Group - Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme, NHS Education for Scotland, Dundee, UK

Guidelines International Network. G-I-N Conference 2012. Berlin, 22.-25.08.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. DocO36

DOI: 10.3205/12gin068, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12gin0681

Veröffentlicht: 10. Juli 2012

© 2012 Young et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Background: Clinical guidance is a common strategy to promote knowledge translation (KT). However, the simple publication of guidance is unlikely to optimise practice. In Scotland, to support the translation of national clinical guidance for dentistry into practice, a multidisciplinary research collaboration developed a standardised KT framework embedded within the guidance development process.

Objectives: Timely evaluation of the translation of national clinical guidance to establish the need for and choice of theoretically informed KT interventions.

Methods: A diagnostic analysis begins at the start of each guidance development project. Information is gathered about current practice. Key recommendations and associated behaviours are identified and prioritised. Stakeholder questionnaires and interviews are used to identify barriers and enablers. Where possible, routinely collected data are used to measure compliance with the guidance and to inform decisions about whether a KT intervention is required.

Results: The framework has been applied to seven guidance projects. Findings have informed the guidance development process for all. For two (decontamination and oral health assessment) KT interventions have been informed by the diagnostic analysis and evaluated in randomised controlled trials embedded within routine service delivery.

Discussion: The embedding of a KT framework within a national programme of guidance development offers a unique opportunity to inform and influence guidance development and translation. The framework informs dental practitioners, policy-makers and patients on how best to translate national recommendations into routine clinical activities.

Implications for guideline developers/users: While based in Scotland and focused on dental guidance, this KT framework is generalisable across jurisdictions and disciplines.