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57. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neuropathologie und Neuroanatomie (DGNN)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neuropathologie und Neuroanatomie

12. - 15.09.2012, Erlangen

Banner: 57. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neuropathologie und Neuroanatomie

Dispersible amyloid beta protein oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils in symptomatic AD, preclinical AD and control brains

Meeting Abstract

  • presenting/speaker Ajeet Rijal Upadhaya - University of Ulm, Laboratory of Neuropathology, Ulm, Germany
  • Irina Kosterin - University of Ulm, Laboratory of Neuropathology, Ulm, Germany
  • Jochen Walter - University of Bonn, Neurology, Ulm, Germany
  • Sathish Kumar - University of Bonn, Neurology, Ulm, Germany
  • Marcus Fändrich - Max Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding and Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany
  • Dietmar Rudolf Thal - University of Ulm, Laboratory of Neuropathology, Ulm, Germany

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neuropathologie und Neuroanatomie. 57th Annual Meeting of the German Society for Neuropathology and Neuroanatomy (DGNN). Erlangen, 12.-15.09.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. Doc12dgnnPP4.1

DOI: 10.3205/12dgnn078, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12dgnn0786

Veröffentlicht: 11. September 2012

© 2012 Rijal Upadhaya et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of the amyloid beta (Aβ) protein in the brain. Various forms of Ab aggregates have been described in the AD brains. Soluble Ab protein aggregates have been discussed as toxic agents. Dispersible Aβ aggregates in the brain parenchyma are different from soluble, membrane-associated, and plaque-associated solid aggregates. They are in mixture with the extra or intracellular fluid but can be separated from soluble proteins by ultracentrifugation. We have recently described a critical role of dispersible Ab aggregates for neurodegeneration in the brain of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic mouse models. To clarify the role of dispersible Aβ aggregates in the human brain we analyzed brain homogenates from symptomatic AD (demented individuals with AD related pathology), preclinical AD (preAD, non demented individuals with AD related pathology) and control (non demented individuals without AD pathology) cases.

Native forebrain homogenate was prepared and centrifuged at 14,000 xg. The supernatant containing the mixture of soluble and dispersible fractions was separated from the pellets. Subsequent ultracentrifugation of the supernatant separated the soluble, i.e., the supernatant after ultracentrifugation, from the dispersible fraction, i.e., the resuspended pellet. Western blot analysis exhibited higher levels of dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils precipitated with oligomer (A11) and protofibril/fibril (B10AP) specific antibodies in AD cases compared to controls and preAD cases. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that in addition to Aβ positive plaques, B10AP- and A11-positive material was more frequently observed in AD than in preAD and control cases.

Thus, higher levels of denaturable, dispersible Ab oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils in AD cases compared with that in controls with and without Aβ-plaque pathology strongly suggest that the concentration of dispersible Ab aggregates is relevant for neurodegeneration and for passing the threshold of dementia symptoms. As such, dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils represent presumably toxic forms of Aβ relevant for AD.