gms | German Medical Science

63. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC)
Joint Meeting mit der Japanischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (JNS)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

13. - 16. Juni 2012, Leipzig

Deep brain stimulaton in Huntington's disease – Results of a Phase I pilot trial

Meeting Abstract

  • J. Vesper - Abteilung für Funktionelle Neurochirurgie und Stereotaxie, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • L. Wojtecki - Institut für Klinische Neurowissenschften und Medizinische Psychologie, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • S. Ferreia - Institut für Klinische Neurowissenschften und Medizinische Psychologie, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • S. Elben - Institut für Klinische Neurowissenschften und Medizinische Psychologie, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • S. Groiss - Institut für Klinische Neurowissenschften und Medizinische Psychologie, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
  • A. Schnitzler - Institut für Klinische Neurowissenschften und Medizinische Psychologie, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Japanische Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 63. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC), Joint Meeting mit der Japanischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (JNS). Leipzig, 13.-16.06.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. DocFR.10.08

DOI: 10.3205/12dgnc251, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12dgnc2514

Veröffentlicht: 4. Juni 2012

© 2012 Vesper et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: At present, there is no effective treatment or cure for Huntington's Disease HD patients. There is a high level of evidence that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is successful in the symptomatic treatment of other movement disorders but there are only case reports of DBS in Huntington's Disease (HD). Thus, DBS was evaluated in a prospective pilot trial for the symptomatic treatment of HD. Questions remained concerning the optimal target.

Methods: This phase I clinical trial is based on the hypothesis that DBS of the pallidum can reduce choreatic symptoms. In addition, it should demonstrate which part of the pallidum can be used effectively for the specific features of HD. We report on 6 HD cases, who underwent DBS of the pallidum (GPi/GPe region). 2 patients suffered from the Westphal variant of HD. Using stereotaxy the electrodes were implanted under general anaesthesia, followed by the implantation of a generator system (Kinetra™, Medtronic). Patients were randomized as to Gpi or GPe stimulation and crossed over after 6 weeks. Best contact stimulation was applied for 3 months.

Results: No perioperative complications occurred. The coordinates for the active contacts in the GPi/GPe range were adapted to individual anatomical changes. There were no differences in the total UHDRS between GPi and GPe stimulation. However, not counting the 2 Westphal patients, the total UHDRS of the remaining 4 patients improved significantly under DBS (preop 46.7 to 35.5 at 6 mo postop, p < 0.01). The most effective active contacts were in projection to the border of GPi (n = 3) and GPe (n = 3).

Conclusions: A systematic positive influence of DBS and its safety in HD patients is reported for the first time. In the context of the following MCT, it remains to be clarified which patient group is the most suitable for DBS and which long-term results can be obtained.