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61. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) im Rahmen der Neurowoche 2010
Joint Meeting mit der Brasilianischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie am 20. September 2010

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

21. - 25.09.2010, Mannheim

Progressive osteolytic skull lesions in children detected after minor head injury

Meeting Abstract

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  • Elvis J. Hermann - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Germany
  • Bujung Hong - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Germany
  • Almuth Brandis - Institut für Pathologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Germany
  • Joachim K. Krauss - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Germany

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 61. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) im Rahmen der Neurowoche 2010. Mannheim, 21.-25.09.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. DocP1768

DOI: 10.3205/10dgnc239, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10dgnc2392

Veröffentlicht: 16. September 2010

© 2010 Hermann et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: Osteolytic lesions of the skull in children have a broad differential diagnosis including congenital, inflammatory and neoplastic lesions. The occurence of progressive osteolysis of the skull secondary to head trauma is nearly unknown.

Methods: We present 4 cases of localized progressive cranial osteolysis detected after minor head trauma. All children had CT and MRI scans. Operative resection of the osteolytic lesion was performed in three cases.

Results: There were two girls and two boys. The mean age was 14 years with a range between 16 months and 16 years. All children had a single osteolytic lesion of the skull. In two cases the lamina interna was not involved in the osteolytic process. One of them had no surgery and is still in follow-up after spontaneous regression of the skull osteolysis. In 2 cases with complete bone involvement, cranioplasty was required. The localization was parietal in three cases and frontal in one case. Pathological examination revealed a cavernous hemangioma, fibrous dysplasia and an organized hemorrhage with focal papillary endothelial hyperplasia, respectively. Postoperatively, all patients were asymptomatic. No further treatment was necessary.

Conclusions: In general, it is advisable to resect progressive osteolytic lesions of the skull following mild head trauma to confirm the histopathological diagnosis and to stop progressive osteolysis. In cases with focal inflammatory changes, however, spontaneous regression may also occur. Due to the rarity of such lesions their development and natural course remain to be fully understood and classified.