gms | German Medical Science

59. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC)
3. Joint Meeting mit der Italienischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (SINch)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

01. - 04.06.2008, Würzburg

Risk potential of autologous mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in glioblastoma patients

Risikopotential autologer Stammzelltransplantation bei Patienten mit Glioblastom

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author C. Schichor - Neurochirurgische Klinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
  • E. Sobala - Neurochirurgische Klinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
  • G. Rosland - Institut für Anatomie und Zellbiologie Bergen, Norwegen
  • R. Bjerkvig - Institut für Anatomie und Zellbiologie Bergen, Norwegen
  • J.-C. Tonn - Neurochirurgische Klinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
  • R. Goldbrunner - Neurochirurgische Klinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Società Italiana di Neurochirurgia. 59. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC), 3. Joint Meeting mit der Italienischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (SINch). Würzburg, 01.-04.06.2008. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2008. DocDI.04.05

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgnc2008/08dgnc171.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 30. Mai 2008

© 2008 Schichor et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: Adult human mesenchymal stem cells have been successfully used in animal experiments as a source for cell based strategies. Their differentiation potential, their expandability as well as their selective recruitment by malignant glioma cells makes them ideal candidates for cell-based treatment strategies. Aim of our study was to evaluate whether in vitro expansion of stem cells or interaction of stem cells with malignant cells bears an immanent risk of tumor formation.

Methods: Adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were obtained from bone marrow donations of healthy volunteers (n=16). Cells have been characterized by intense FACS analysis and differentiation assays. Kept in standard culture conditions, cell morphology, proliferation rates and anchorage independent growth was analyzed. Cells were implanted into immune-deficient mice (NOD/skid) subcutaneously as well as intravenously. Expression level of telomerase as an indicator for immortalization was detected using RT-PCR.

Results: Isolated cells from healthy donors were characterized as mesenchymal stem cells by typical marker expression in FACS analysis and by differentiation into bone or fat producing lineages. In vitro, an initial low proliferation rate was followed by a replicative phase of senescence with no detectable proliferation. Cells of samples, which overcame the state of senescence(n=8), showed a marked increase in proliferation rate, a changed morphology and anchorage independent growth potential as an indicator for an acquired malignant potential. In animal experiments, these transformed cells showed local tumor formation. RT-PCR showed signs of hTERT-overexpression in malignant transformed cells.

Conclusions: Stem cell isolation from glioma patients for autologous re-implantation after transfection as a cellular vector bears a potential risk of stem cell tumor induction. Further studies are necessary in order to minimize this risk, inherent in expansion of stem cells in vitro.