gms | German Medical Science

58. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V. (DGNC)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

26. bis 29.04.2007, Leipzig

Intraoperative ultrasound in spinal cavernomas

Intraoperativer Ultraschall bei spinalen Kavernomen

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author D.M. Schulte - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Standort Marburg
  • L. Benes - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Standort Marburg
  • S. Köhler - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Standort Marburg
  • W. Tirakotai - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Standort Marburg
  • U. Sure - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Standort Marburg
  • H. Bertalanffy - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Standort Marburg

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 58. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC). Leipzig, 26.-29.04.2007. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2007. DocP 037

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgnc2007/07dgnc292.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 11. April 2007

© 2007 Schulte et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Objective: As intraspinal cavernomas are increasingly detected with modern imaging techniques surgical treatment can be an option to prevent deficits following hemorrhage or to reduce symptoms. Neuronavigation provides a helpful tool in intracranial procedures and spinal instrumentation but is of limited use for surgery inside the spinal cord. Especially in deeply located small cavernomas with no or only minor bleeding an exact localization can be difficult.

Methods: Modern ultrasound devices provide high resolution and small ultrasound probes that can be used for intraoperative intraspinal localization of small intramedullary lesions. The technique has been used in eight patients with small cavernomas beneath the surface with difficulty to localize the most direct and minimally invasive access.

Results: Preoperative symptoms of the patients varied from arm or leg pain to dysesthesia, numbness and spastic or atactic gait. The age of the patients was between 23 and 71 years (mean 44 years). Location of the cavernomas was the cervical (n=4) and the thoracic spine (n=4). The intraoperative ultrasound was used transdurally in all patients to confirm the extent of laminectomy, wich was enlarged in two cases. In three patients additionally an intradural localization with an echogenic marker was successfully applied leading to a direct access to the lesion. Postoperatively the symptoms of the patients improved in 5 patients, 2 patients remained unchanged, one patient suffers from persisting neuropathy. The follow-up MRI scans showed no recurrent cavernoma in any patient.

Conclusions: Intraoperative ultrasound is a reliable method for localization of deeply seated cavernous lesions inside the spinal cord without signs on the pial surface. Transdural imaging confirms the correct level, intradural sonography together with echogenic markers provides exact determination of the least harmful intramedullary access and helps to minimize postoperative deficits.