gms | German Medical Science

58. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e. V. (DGNC)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) e. V.

26. bis 29.04.2007, Leipzig

Analysis of bloodvessel micro-structure and blood flow by optical coherence tomography

Analyse von Blutfluss und Mikrostruktur von Blutgefäßen durch optische Kohärenz-Tomographie

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author S.R. Kantelhardt - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen
  • W. H. Müller - Institut für Biomedizinische Optik und Medizinisches Laserzentrum, Lübeck
  • H. J. Böhringer - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen
  • G. Hüttmann - Institut für Biomedizinische Optik und Medizinisches Laserzentrum, Lübeck
  • V. Rohde - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen
  • A. Giese - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 58. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC). Leipzig, 26.-29.04.2007. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2007. DocSA.06.05

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgnc2007/07dgnc170.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 11. April 2007

© 2007 Kantelhardt et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

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Objective: Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a laser based technology for in vivo imaging which allows a high-resolution view into intact tissues. We have previously demonstrated the capacity and high sensitivity of OCT in the detection of experimental gliomas in mouse brain as well as human brain tumor tissue in situ. The basis for this analysis is the intensity of the reflection of laser light from deep tissue layers. By using a new software, developed for this purpose, further information can be extracted from the OCT signal. Doppler-OCT uses the phase difference of the reflection between the corpuscular blood component in motion compared to a reference beam, which allows visualization of the blood flow.

Methods: OCT analysis of blood vessels was done in fixed human brain specimens and in an in vivo model system. The three dimensional architecture of human cerebral blood vessels was studied by a novel high resolution and high speed swept-source OCT device. Doppler-OCT was performed based on the conventional OCT signal using a phase difference scanning software.

Results: Blood vessels could be analyzed in their native environment without the need for dissection by a no-touch technique. Data sets of large segments of major cerebral blood vessels could be acquired within seconds and reconstructed into three dimensional objects recreating a virtual image of the vascular anatomy. The normal microstructure of the vascular wall as well as pathologies such as plaques or stenoses could be visualized and measured. Blood vessels down to capillary size could be detected. The blood flow was visualized using Doppler-OCT without the application of contrast enhancing agents. Color coding of blood flow velocity allowed a differentiation between arterial and venous blood vessels.

Conclusions: We have demonstrated that OCT can provide cross sectional images of normal and pathological blood vessels in the brain. Three dimensional reconstruction of sequential images allows a display of the vascular anatomy. Doppler-OCT can visualize and quantify blood flow. Calibration of the phase difference analysis may soon provide exact blood velocity data. This may allow detection of hyperemic regions within tumor tissue for example, as well as blood flow measurements in neurovascular settings such as aneurysm surgery.