gms | German Medical Science

125. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

22. - 25.04.2008, Berlin

Diffusion-tensor-imaging (DTI) in Syringomyelia

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author F. Roser - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Tübingen
  • G. Maier - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Tübingen
  • T. Nägele - Abteilung für Neuroradiologie, Tübingen
  • M.S. Tatagiba - Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Tübingen
  • U. Klose - Abteilung für Neuroradiologie, Tübingen

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. 125. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. Berlin, 22.-25.04.2008. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2008. Doc08dgch9605

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/dgch2008/08dgch367.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 16. April 2008

© 2008 Roser et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Introduction: Syringomyelia can result in major functional disability. Conventional imaging techniques frequently fail to detect arachnoid adhesions as the underlying cause of the syringomyelia. Moreover a proposition whether the syringomyelia is of a dynamic type and might lead to neurological deficits shortly is so far not applicable. We hypothesize that fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from diffusion-tensor-imaging (DTI) computations is a sensitive parameter in syringomyelia to detect progressive cases.

Material and methods: Six patients with cervical syringomyelia and two healthy controls were examined. All underwent electrophysiological (SEP/MEP/silent period) recordings. Syringomyelia in all patients was comparable according size, shape and location. Imaging was performed at a 1.5 T with a six-element spine coil. Anatomical images were acquired with a 3D-CISS-sequence; DTI with an echo-planar-imaging sequence (thickness 5mm, b-value 800 s/mm2) using the GRAPPA-technique. The positions were centered around the syrinx, in the volunteers between the C2 and Th1. DTI-data were interpolated to a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm. After calculation of a diffusion tensor in each pixel, a FA-map was calculated and profiles of the FA-values across the spinal cord were calculated in all slices and compared with the profiles of the T2-weighted data-set.

Results: FA-values were lower at the level of all examined syringes and reach normal values beyond them. There were no pre-syrinx changes in the white matter tracts, no signs of FA-changes beneath the syrinx.

Conclusion: DTI Imaging of cervical syringomyelia demonstrate preserved white matter fibre tracts around and beyond the syrinx. This finding is consistent with preserved electrophysiological values in all studied patients despite a space occupying syringomyelia. FA-values were lower at the level of all examined syringes and reach normal values beyond them. There were no pre-syrinx changes in the white matter tracts, no signs of FA-changes beneath the syrinx. Nevertheless DTI-Imaging of the cervical spine provides quantitative information of pathological characteristics beyond the abnormalities visible on MRI.