gms | German Medical Science

22nd Annual Meeting of the German Retina Society

German Retina Society

26.06. - 27.06.2009, Berlin

Light in vitreoretinal surgery

Meeting Abstract

  • Stefan Dithmar - University Eye Clinic of Heidelberg
  • A. E. Höh - University Eye Clinic of Heidelberg
  • R. Amberger - Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg
  • M. Ruppenstein - University Eye Clinic of Heidelberg
  • T. Ach - University Eye Clinic of Heidelberg

German Retina Society. 22nd Annual Meeting of the German Retina Society. Berlin, 26.-27.06.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. DocRG2009-40

DOI: 10.3205/09rg41, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09rg412

This is the translated version of the article.
The original version can be found at: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/rg2009/09rg41.shtml

Published: June 29, 2009

© 2009 Dithmar et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Background: The new generation of light sources for vitreoretinal surgery allows excellent intraoperative visualization. However, the risk of induced light toxicity is often not exactly known by surgeons. The aim of this study is to summarize relevant factors for photochemical light damage and to examine commercially available light sources and endoilluminators regarding these factors.

Methods: We examined six different light sources (Accurus, Xenotron II, Megatron S3, Bright Star, Photon 1 und Photon 2) and associated light fibers (20ga, 23ga, focused and wide-field endoilluminators). Wavelength spectra and radiant power were measured. Maximal irradiances for different working distances to the retina were determined. Maximally tolerable operating times were calculated.

Results: Wavelenght spectra differ significantly among the examined light sources, even within the blue light zone. Additive filters eliminate short wavelenghts effectively, but can also reduce the intraoperative visualization of retinal details. There are considerable differences in maximal irradiances between light sources (up to factor 30). Calculated maximally tolerable operating times for 5 mm working distance vary from 0,7 minutes to 4 hours.

Conclusion: Commercially available light sources for vitreoretinal surgery offer excellent intraoperative visualization. However, the physical characteristics of the devices differ substantially. In order to avoid retinal light damage the user should have detailed knowledge about the properties of his light source and endoilluminators. Wavelenght spectrum, irradiance, type of endoilluminator, working distance and operating time are important factors for the risc of light toxicity.