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Physical activity and successful aging
10th International EGREPA Conference

European Group for Research into Elderly and Physical Activity

14.09. - 16.09.2006 in Köln

Organized Sports and the very aged - facing a societal duty

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author C. Löcke - German Olympic Sports Confederation, Germany
  • C. Becker - Robert Bosch Hospital, Stuttgart, Germany
  • H. Mechling - German Sports University Cologne, Germany
  • C. Rott - University of Heidelberg, Germany
  • W. Schneeloch - Sports Federation of North Rhine-Westphalia
  • R. Schneider - German Sports Federation for the disabled, Germany

Physical activity and successful aging. Xth International EGREPA Conference. Cologne, 14.-16.09.2006. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2006. Doc06pasa003

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at:

Published: December 18, 2006

© 2006 Löcke et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.



Research indicates that older persons' engagement in physical activity can extend years of active independent life, reduce morbidity and mortality, and lower health care costs. However, physical activity decreases with age. Only 7% of the oldest old engage in physical activities and exercise. Therefore, the questions of this discussion panel are:

  • How can we motivate the oldest old?
  • Which strategies are necessary to get through to the oldest old?
  • How to bring offers of physical activities to them?

Clemens Löcke summarizes the goals of the discussion panel. Namely, the strategies of implementation all over the country, definition of the target group, and the responsibilities and the division of functions.

The round table will start with 'the science'. Recent results and evidence-based research about the effects and benefits of physical activity for health and successful aging in the oldest old will be presented. Against this background Clemens Becker, Christoph Rott, and Heinz Mechling will discuss the subject, which offers are needed for the oldest old and how to address the aged.

In the second round table Walter Schneeloch and representatives of some sport clubs will talk about the task of 'the organized sport' in enhancing the supply and quality of activity programmes, and the role of network with other institutions and organizations.

In the third round table issues of 'relief' will debate. Beyond the many tasks, sport clubs can not solely manage the additional activity programmes for the oldest old. Reinhard Schneider will show possibilities of support, e.g. financial aid, sponsorship.

The audience has the opportunity to comment the contributions and to address questions to the experts.