gms | German Medical Science

10. Kongress für Infektionskrankheiten und Tropenmedizin (KIT 2010)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Infektiologie,
Deutsche AIDS-Gesellschaft,
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Tropenmedizin und Internationale Gesundheit,
Paul-Ehrlich-Gesellschaft für Chemotherapie

23.06. - 26.06.2010, Köln

Prevalence and risk factors of Hepatitis B and C in treatment naïve HIV positive patients

Coinfektion mit Hepatitis B und C bei therapienaiven HIV-Patienten – Prävalenz und Risikofaktoren

Meeting Abstract

  • S. Reuter - Universitätsklinik Düsseldorf, Klinik für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Infektiologie, Düsseldorf, Germany
  • M. Oette - Krankenhaus der Augustinerinnen, Köln, Germany
  • F. C. Wilhelm - Institut für Virologie, Uniklinik Köln, Germany
  • R. Kaiser - Institut für Virologie, Uniklinik Köln, Germany
  • M. Balduin - Institut für Virologie, Uniklinik Köln, Germany
  • F. Schweizer - Institut für Virologie, Uniklinik Köln, Germany
  • J. Verheyen - Institut für Virologie, Uniklinik Köln, Germany
  • O. Adams - Universitätsklinik Düsseldorf, Institut für Virologie, Düsseldorf, Germany
  • B. Beggel - Max Planck Institut für Informatik, Saarbrücken, Germany
  • D. Häussinger - Universitätsklinik Düsseldorf, Klinik für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Infektiologie, Düsseldorf, Germany
  • RESINA Studiengruppe

10. Kongress für Infektionskrankheiten und Tropenmedizin (KIT 2010). Köln, 23.-26.06.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. DocHIV 06-4

DOI: 10.3205/10kit004, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10kit0049

Published: June 2, 2010

© 2010 Reuter et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

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Introduction: In HIV treatment-naïve patients we analyzed the prevalence of serological and molecular markers for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). We aimed at the identification of risk factors for chronic or occult hepatitis B infection (oHBV) and HCV infection.

Patients, materials and methods: We included 918 treatment-naive HIV patients of the RESINA-cohort recruited from the University Hospitals in Cologne and Düsseldorf, Germany. Blood samples were analyzed immediately before start of HIV-treatment for antibodies against HIV, HBV and HCV, HBs-antigen and viral loads for HIV and HBV.

Results: Markers for present or past HBV infection (HBs-antigen and/or anti-HBc) were found in 398/918 patients (43.4%). HBs-antigen was detected in 41/918 (4.5%), HBV DNA in 34/554 patients (6.14%) and oHBV in 16 /554 cases (2.9%). Neither the presence of anti-HBs (8 /16) nor the absence of all HBV seromarkers (4/16) ruled out oHBV infection. Anti-HCV was found in 97/917 (10.6%) samples and 60 /913 (6.6%) had serological signs of co-infection with HBV. In a multivariate analysis, IV drug use (IVDU) increased the likelihood (odds) for a HCV positive serostatus by the factor 70 and an increase of the HI-viral load (HIVL) of 30,000 copies/ml decreased the likelihood by 0.9. Transmitted HIV resistance mutations were significantly correlated with active HBV infection (p=0.001) and with HCV positivity (p=0.028). Transmitted HBV associated mutations were significantly more often found in HCV positive patients (p=0.022).

Conclusions: Both HBV- and HCV-co-infections were frequent in HIV treatment-naive patients. Factors independently associated with HCV co-infection were IVDU and low HIVL. oHBV constituted almost half of all chronic HBV infections. Due to a lack of risk factors indicating oHBV, the determination of serological markers should routinely be accompanied by analysis of HBV DNA.