gms | German Medical Science

81st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

12.05. - 16.05.2010, Wiesbaden

Do young women present better nasal air conditioning capacity than older women?

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author Evangelia Tsakiropoulou - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hippokratio General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Gerhard Rettinger - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Ulm, Germany
  • Diana Sannwald - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Ulm, Germany
  • Jrg Lindemann - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Ulm, Germany

Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. 81. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft fr Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie. Wiesbaden, 12.-16.05.2010. Dsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10hnod646

doi: 10.3205/10hnod646, urn:nbn:de:0183-10hnod6465

Published: April 22, 2010

© 2010 Tsakiropoulou et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Introduction: Post-menopausal women often complain about nasal symptoms despite no objective findings are present. Many studies suggest that female hormones can affect nasal physiology due to changes of the mucosa. The aim of the study was to investigate the nasal air conditioning capacity in women depending on their age.

Material/methods: Forty healthy women were enrolled into the study. Both sides of nasal cavities were examined. Two study groups were formed. Group A (n=40) were post-menopausal women older than 60 years (median age: 70 years, range, 61 to 84 years). Group B (n=40) were women between 20 and 40 years old with a median age of 27 years. In vivo measurements of intranasal air temperature and humidity were synchronously performed by means of a miniaturized thermocouple/humidity sensor at three detection sites (nasal entrance, nasal valve area and anterior turbinate area). Additionally, active anterior rhinomanometry (AAR) and acoustic rhinometry (AR) were performed.

Results: The median end-inspiratory air temperature (C) / absolute humidity (g/m) values recorded in group A were 24.0 C / 12 g/m at nasal entrance, 25.0 C/14 g/m within the nasal valve region and 25.0 C/16 g/m anterior to the head of the middle turbinate. The corresponding values in group B were 27.0 C/12.0 g/m, 27.0 C/15.0 g/m and 27.0 C/16.0 g/m at the three detection sites. The temperature and humidity values were significantly lower in the older women group (p<0.05). Additionally, the minimal cross-sectional areas and nasal volumes were significantly higher in older women (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Older women present "dryer and cooler" nasal cavities. This could be explained by age related changes of the mucosa due to altered hormonal profile.