gms | German Medical Science

83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

16.05. - 20.05.2012, Mainz

Evidence for solitary chemosensory cells (SCC) in the human nose

Meeting Abstract

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German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Mainz, 16.-20.05.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. Doc12hno50

DOI: 10.3205/12hno50, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12hno503

Published: July 23, 2012

© 2012 Braun et al.
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Outline

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Background: So-called solitary chemosensory cells (SCC) have recently been described in the respiratory and vomeronasal epithelium of the nose of rodents. SCC express G-protein coupled receptors for sweet, umami and bitter taste transduction and are thought to mediate trigeminal reflexes upon stimulation with chemical irritants. The present study analyzes the presence of SCC in the nose of humans.

Methodology: In five patients, gene expression of taste receptors families was studied in tissue samples from respiratory mucosa and the vomeronasal organ using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST Array, and by immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies.

Results: Immunohistochemistry revealed that SCC expressing G-protein coupled receptors for sweet, umami and bitter taste transduction are present in the human nose. cDNA microarray analysis congruently showed that SCC expressing bitter taste receptors accumulate in the vomeronasal organ compared to the respiratory epithelium.

Conclusions: SCC expressing taste receptors are also present in the nose of humans. Since SCC are thought to mediate trigeminal reflexes, their role in the pathogenesis of nasal hyperreagibility should be elucidated in further studies.