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83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

16.05. - 20.05.2012, Mainz

What happens to the bony electrode groove? – A classical technique in the light of revision surgery

Meeting Abstract

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  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Wolfram Pethe - HNO-Klinik, AMEOS-Klinikum, Halberstadt, Germany
  • Joerg Langer - HNO-Klinik, AMEOS-Klinikum, Halberstadt, Germany
  • Klaus Begall - HNO-Klinik, AMEOS-Klinikum, Halberstadt, Germany

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Mainz, 16.-20.05.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. Doc12hno46

DOI: 10.3205/12hno46, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12hno467

Published: July 23, 2012

© 2012 Pethe et al.
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Outline

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Aim: To investigate the behavior of the receiver-stimulator package and the electrodes in the bony groove after cochlear implantation.

Material and methods: Digital intraoperative photos and operation reports of 43 cases of cochlear implant revision surgery had been analyzed retrospectively.

Results: In all cases the receiver-stimulator package had been in place. It was always covered in connective tissue. In 10 out of 43 cases a drilling burr had been used to free the electrode from the bone. In 10 cases the mastoidectomy was fully closed by bone. Scaring had be no problem in the posterior tympanotomy and the cochleostomy. In two cases a complete reimplantation had been impossible due to intracochlear ossification and scaring.

Conclusions: Deep grooves for the receiver-stimulator package and the electrodes help to secure the positioning. Healing processes including osteoneogenesis lead to a partial or complete bony cover of the mastoidectomy and the electrode groove. Difficulties in reimplantation occur if at all during the replacement