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83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

16.05. - 20.05.2012, Mainz

Quality of life analysis of surgery for outer ear canal exostoses and osteomata

Meeting Abstract

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German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 83rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Mainz, 16.-20.05.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. Doc12hno37

DOI: 10.3205/12hno37, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12hno378

Published: July 23, 2012

© 2012 Hempel et al.
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Outline

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Background: The literature reports that surgery for outer ear canal exostoses and osteomata cannot achive full symptom controll in all cases and has a substantial complication rate. Many authors consider the measurement of health-related quality of life as the most important parameter in the evaluation of therapies. This work is the first quality of life analysis of surgery for outer ear canal exostoses and osteomata.

Patients and Methods: 30 patients were assessed after surgery for outer ear canal exostoses and osteomata with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), a well-validated tool for measuring the impact of ENT surgical interventions on the health-related quality of life.

Results: The mean total GBI score was 14.6 (p < 0.001), and 83.3% of the patients had a total GBI score > 0, suggesting a benefit from the operation. In contrast to the general subscale score (mean 21.0, p < 0.001), the subscales for physical health and social support showed no significant changes. 90% of the patients were satisfied with the results of the operation, and 86.7% would again decide in favor of the operation. Most patients suffered preoperatively from hearing loss, wax retention and recurrent external otitis. Postoperatively, 70% stated that they were free of any symptoms. The patients not satiesfied were the only ones with negative GBI total scores in the whole patient collective and all had complications from surgery.

Conclusions: Surgery for outer ear canal exostoses and osteomata can significantly raise the quality of life of affected patients and leads to a high rate of patient satisfaction. Complications are the most important factor for a negative impact of the operation on the patients' quality of life. In the opinion of the authors, only symptomatic patients should therefore receive surgery.