gms | German Medical Science

81st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

12.05. - 16.05.2010, Wiesbaden

Effects of a therapy with botulinum toxin A for functional indications in otorhinolaryngology on the health-related quality of life

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Thomas Braun - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
  • author Robert Gürkov - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
  • author John Martin Hempel - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
  • author Alexander Berghaus - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
  • author Eike Krause - Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 81st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Wiesbaden, 12.-16.05.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10hno114

DOI: 10.3205/10hno114, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10hno1143

Published: July 6, 2010

© 2010 Braun et al.
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Outline

Text

Background: Botulinum toxin A (BTA) is used for many indications in otorhinolaryngology. For the most functional indications, no studies with validated tools exist to analyze the effects of this therapy on the health-related quality of life, a parameter nowadays considered an essential evaluation criterium of a therapy. Since an off-label use of BTA is common, this question also is of medicolegal and economic importance.

Methods: 40 patients who were treated with BTA for functional disorders in our department received the Glasgow Benefit Inventory. This well-validated retrospective questionnaire measures the effects of otorhinolaryngological interventions on the health-related quality of life. Scores from –100 (maximal negative effect) to 100 (maximal positive effect) can be achieved.

Results: 29 patients (return rate 72.5%) achieved the following mean total scores: 1.2 (sialorrhea, n=7), 22.6 (gustatory sweating, n=8), 20.6 (ear clicking due to palatal tremor, n=5), 15.0 (voice prothesis disorders after laryngectomy due to pharyngoesophageal spasm, n=5), 38.9 (adductor type spasmodic dysphonia, n=2), and 27.8 (oromandibular dystonia, n=2). The percentage of patients with an elevated health-related quality of life, i. e. positive total scores, differed considerably for the various indications: sialorrhea 29%, gustatory sweating 88%, palatal tremor 60%, voice prothesis disorders after laryngectomy 60%, spasmodic dysphonia 100%, oromandibular dystonia 100%.

Conclusions: A therapy with BTA can elevate the health-related quality of life in all the indications investigated, but not in all patients. Follow-up studies with larger numbers of patients have to show which patients take the most benefit from a therapy with BTA.