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81st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

12.05. - 16.05.2010, Wiesbaden

Immunoglobulin E in nasal secretions – new routes in the diagnosis of allergies

Meeting Abstract

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German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 81st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Wiesbaden, 12.-16.05.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10hno096

DOI: 10.3205/10hno096, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10hno0967

Published: July 6, 2010

© 2010 Hofer et al.
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Outline

Text

The diagnostic procedure of allergic rhinitis is qualitatively based on skin prick test (SPT) and quantitatively on specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) measuring. These tests reveal sensitizations, however do not predict allergy to a specific allergen. The aim of this work is the comparison between IgE levels from blood serum and nasal secretions.

Based on a new method of nasal mucous sampling with foam patches 175 consecutive patients with suspected perennial or seasonal rhinitis receiving SPT were screened concerning blood serum and nasal secretion IgE levels. The results were compared to the nasal allergen challenge reactions.

76% of the patients showed positive reactions on different allergens in SPT, of which 92% were approved in the serum. Serum total IgE levels were 3.2 fold higher than nasal IgE levels in positive SPT (126 vs. 39 kU/l) and 4.2 fold higher in negative SPT (7.6 vs. 1.8 kU/l). In differentiation of specific allergens pollen IgE levels showed almost equal values, whereas in dust mites serum IgE levels were 4.4 fold higher than nasal IgE levels. Correlation of serum IgE levels to clinical symptoms proven by nasal challenge was poor compared to nasal IgE to clinical symptoms (0.52 vs. 0.78).

In conclusion, local IgE production shows notable differences between blood serum and nasal secretions. In order to maximize the informative value regarding the differentiation between sensitization and allergy, nasal IgE levels seem to provide more information.