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81st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

12.05. - 16.05.2010, Wiesbaden

The treatment of aerophagia by manual-therapeutic intervention – a case report

Meeting Abstract

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  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Christiane Porsch - Universitätsklinik für HNO-Heilkunde, Magdeburg, Germany
  • Wilma Vorwerk - Universitätsklinik für HNO-Heilkunde, Magdeburg, Germany
  • Christoph Arens - Universitätsklinik für HNO-Heilkunde, Magdeburg, Germany

German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 81st Annual Meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. Wiesbaden, 12.-16.05.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10hno014

DOI: 10.3205/10hno014, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10hno0146

Published: July 6, 2010

© 2010 Porsch et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Introduction: Aerophagia is a symptom which is described as unaware aerial gulp within the scope of psychic or vegetative disturbances. The result is often an increased eructation. This symptom is mostly misinterpreted as a psychosomatic concomitant. Though the affected patients are well diagnosed, a sufficient therapy can not be provided. However, a psychosomatic exploration may help.

Casuistic: A 69-year-old female with aerophagia presented at our Phoniatric Department. For several years she complained about attack-like aerophagia caused by cough and deep inspiration. The concurrent dyspnoea during the attacks was distinctive.

In the X-ray examination of the cervical spine (CS) a degenerative change with light joint mismatch of the cervical vertebrae 2 and 3 as well as 4 and 5 were detected. The Ear Nose Throat examination showed a normal status except for a light redness of the larynx. During the examination of the neck a segmental hypomobility (C2/3, C3/4) was palpated. In these segments aerophagia could be triggered. We mobilised manual-therapeutically the CS. The patient felt immediate relieve of the distress.

Conclusions: Manual Therapy has freed an affected Phrenic nerve. According to our findings mobilisation of the cervical spine should be a therapeutic option in patients with aerophagia.