gms | German Medical Science

14. Grazer Konferenz – Qualität der Lehre: New Horizons in Teaching and Learning

22. - 24.04.2010, Wien, Österreich

Team-based learning in a pharmacology course: Use of an audience response system

Poster

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  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Hubert Wiener - Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Education, Vienna, Austria
  • author Herbert Plass - Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Education, Vienna, Austria
  • author Karl Kremser - Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Education, Vienna, Austria
  • author Richard März - Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Education, Vienna, Austria

14. Grazer Konferenz – Qualität der Lehre: New Horizons in Teaching and Learning. Wien, Österreich, 22.-24.04.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. Doc10grako46

DOI: 10.3205/10grako46, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10grako460

Published: November 18, 2010

© 2010 Wiener et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Poster

Purpose: Recently, we described the implementation of team-based learning (TBL) in an intensive course format at the Medical University of Vienna [1]. The present, prospectively designed study, examines how the introduction of an Audience Response System (ARS, TED, "clicker") impacts the process of TBL.

Methods: TBL was an elective covering the pharmacological material of the second year of the medical curriculum: an intensive course format with six 2-hour sessions over a 3-day period was used. Students signed up for the course electronically and were randomly assigned to two equally sized cohorts. In one cohort an ARS was used, in the control cohort TBL was performed without an electronic voting system. The same instructor (HW) moderated both cohorts and identical test questions were used. Students completed a program-evaluation questionnaire (1=strongly disagree, 6=strongly agree) at the end of the course; the ARS cohort answered additional questions.

Results and Conclusion: 119 students (49% females) participated in the courses offered. The response rate to the program-evaluation questionnaire was 86% (n=102). In terms of ARS the item with the largest mean score was "The application of ARS in TBL increases my attention" (5.4± 0.9). The mean score for "The feedback of test results by an ARS supported the learning proces" was somewhat lower (4.4±1.4). Students did not feel uncomfortable with the ARS in TBL as indicated by the very low mean score of the statement "The application of an ARS interferes with TBL" (1.6±0.9). There was no significant difference between the two cohorts in assessment of TBL concerning knowledge acquisition and motivational dimensions. Taken together, the application of an ARS impacts the process of TBL in terms of increasing attention of the students and supporting the learning process. It also made the sessions more exciting for the moderator.


References

1.
Wiener H, Plass H, Marz R. Team-based learning in intensive course format for first-year medical students. Croat Med J. 2009;50(1):69-76. DOI: 10.3325/cmj.2009.50.69 External link