gms | German Medical Science

54. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie e.V. (GMDS)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie

07. bis 10.09.2009, Essen

Influence of short-term exposure to ultra-fine particles on systemic inflammatory markers

Meeting Abstract

  • Sabine Hertel - Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Essen
  • Anja Viehmann - Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Essen
  • Michael Nonnemacher - Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Essen
  • Susanne Moebus - Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Essen
  • Martina Bröcker-Preuss - Klinik für Endokrinologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Essen
  • Stefan Möhlenkamp - Westdeutsches Herzzentrum, Essen
  • Raimund Erbel - Westdeutsches Herzzentrum, Essen
  • Hermann Jakobs - Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung, Köln
  • Christoph Kessler - Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung, Köln
  • Michael Memmesheimer - Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung, Köln
  • Karl-Heinz Jöckel - Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Essen
  • Barbara Hoffmann - Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Essen

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie. 54. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie (gmds). Essen, 07.-10.09.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. Doc09gmds047

DOI: 10.3205/09gmds047, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09gmds0473

Published: September 2, 2009

© 2009 Hertel et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Background: Fine particulate matter has been linked with systemic inflammatory responses. It is hypothesized that smaller particles confer higher toxicity. The aim is to analyze lag structure and shape of the association between short-term exposure to ultrafine and fine particles and systemic inflammation.

Material and Methods: We use baseline data (2000–2003) of the Heinz-Nixdorf-Recall Study, a population-based cohort study of 4814 participants in the Ruhr Area. A chemistry transport model was applied to model daily surface concentrations of particulate air pollutants on a grid of 1 km2. Exposure included particle number (PN) and particulate matter mass concentration with an aerodynamic diameter ≤1.0µm (PM1.0), ≤2.5µm (PM2.5) and ≤10µm (PM10). Generalized additive models were used to explore the relation between air pollutants with single day lags and averaging times of up to 28 days before examination, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). We adjusted for meteorology, season, time trend, time-invariant and -variant personal characteristics. Effects are compared per increase in interquartile range (IQR) of the exposure metric. Participants with acute inflammatory diseases(hs-CRP>100mg/L), no exposure assessment or personal characteristics are excluded.

Results: Median hs-CRP level in the 4042 included participants was 1.5 mg/L. Median daily concentration of PN was 84,946/ml (IQR 46,685/ml), of PM1.0 9.9µg/m³ (IQR 8.3µg/m³), of PM2.5 14.5µg/m³ (IQR 11.4µg/m³) and of PM10 16.8µg/m³ (IQR 13.2µg/m³). A linear association between PN and hs-CRP could be observed for single day lags and for averaged PN concentrations with higher estimates for longer averaging times. The highest hs-CRP-increase of 6.9%(95%-CI:1.7%,12.4%) per 33,441/ml increase in PN was found for the 28-day average. Other particle metrics showed a linear, but less clear and consistent association.

Discussion: Stronger effects for longer averaging times imply that particle exposure has a cumulative effect on systemic inflammation. Traffic exposure, a major source of urban PN, might be responsible for this effect.