gms | German Medical Science

54. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie e.V. (GMDS)

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie

07. bis 10.09.2009, Essen

Cooking and the risk of incident uveal melanoma

Meeting Abstract

  • Andrea Schmidt-Pokrzywniak - Institut für Klinische Epidemiologie der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle Wittenberg, Halle
  • Karl-Heinz Jöckel - Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Essen
  • Anja Marr - Institut für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Essen
  • Norbert Bornfeld - Augenklinik, universität Duisburg-Essen, Essen
  • Andreas Stang - Institut für Klinische Epidemiologie der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle Wittenberg, Halle

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie. 54. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie (gmds). Essen, 07.-10.09.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. Doc09gmds039

DOI: 10.3205/09gmds039, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09gmds0395

Published: September 2, 2009

© 2009 Schmidt-Pokrzywniak et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Introduction: Although a rare disease, uveal melanoma of the eye is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults. Only a few consistent risk factors have been identified for this disease. Three recent studies indicated that cooks may have an increased risk of uveal melanoma. Here we report findings of the RIFA case-control study regarding cooking and uveal melanoma risk [1], [2], [3].

Methods: We conducted a case-control study of uveal melanoma and occupational exposures. Overall, 455 cases and 827 population controls were interviewed. We classified subjects as exposed if they ever worked within the job task of cooks for at least six months or more (ISCO 68: 5-31). Furthermore we asked the subjects if they had cooked personally. If yes, we classified them as personally cooked. We used a job-specific supplementary questionnaire to obtain details of the job tasks and materials that were used.

We used conditional logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI).

Results: Overall, 25 controls (3.0%) and 13 cases (2.8%) ever worked as cooks according to ISCO 5-31. Overall, we observed no association between cooking and the risk of uveal melanoma [cooks according to ISCO 5-31: OR 1.1 (95%CI 0.5-2.1);]. When we restricted the source population of our study to the same population as in the previous German study (population of Northrhine-Westphalia, 35-74 age), we found an increased risk for uveal melanoma [overall: OR 1.6 (95%CI 0.4-6.1; women: OR 3.4 (95%CI 0.6-19.1), men: zero cases].

Discussion: These results are in conflict with those from former studies. Potential explanations include, but are not limited to, changing exposure scenarios over time and some kind of selection bias either in the former studies or in the present one. Further analysis are planed that may give insights into potential selection effects.


References

1.
Guénel P, Laforest L, Cyr D, et al. Occupational risk factors, ultraviolet radiation, and ocular melanoma: a case-control study in France. Cancer Causes Control. 2001;12: 451-9.
2.
Stang A, Ahrens W, Baumgardt-Elms C, et al. Cooking and uveal melanoma risk: results from two German case-control studies. Cancer Causes Control. 2003;14:377-80.
3.
Vågerö D, Swerdlow AJ, Beral V. Occupation and malignant melanoma: a study based on cancer registration data in England and Wales and in Sweden. Br J Ind Med. 1990;47:317-24.