gms | German Medical Science

Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung (GMA)

05.10. - 08.10.2011, München

Feasibility and impact of a clinical skill training course in the early basic science modules of the new Charité medical curriculum

Poster

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Harm Peters - Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Olaf Ahlers - Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Irene Brunk - Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Jakob Hein - Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Tanja Hitzblech - Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Sabine Ludwig - Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Asja Maaz - Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Jörg Pelz - Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Jan Breckwoldt - Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany

Jahrestagung der Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung (GMA). München, 05.-08.10.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2011. Doc11gma138

DOI: 10.3205/11gma138, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11gma1381

Published: September 26, 2011

© 2011 Peters et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Question: The Charité introduced a new modular curriculum of medicine in 2010. The first 6 modules are focusing on basic science contents. Goal was to tailor a clinical skills course for this setting.

Methods: The starting-up module was followed by “Elements of Life”, “Biology of the Cell”, “Signal and Information Systems”, “Growth, Tissue and Organ” and “Human Being and Society”, all modules 4 weeks each. The starting-up module included brief introduction lectures (4 h anatomy, 2 h physiology), after which groups of 8 students went to various hospital wards for 2.5 h every other week. Each group was trained by one clinician. The structured curriculum focused on defined skills to be trained in each session and elements of living anatomy while giving freedom on what kind of patients to be seen. A detailed manual was provided to both teachers and students.

Results: Throughout all modules, clinical skill training was rated among the best teaching sessions by the students. The training was evaluated as a high motivation factor for learning of basic science knowledge. All students passed the end-term clinical skill assessment.

Conclusion: Early clinical training is feasible, effective and has a high motivational impact on basic science learning. Clinical skill training can be employed to foster learning motivation during early medical student education.