gms | German Medical Science

G-I-N Conference 2012

Guidelines International Network

22.08 - 25.08.2012, Berlin

Better Practices in Rehabilitation in Africa: Learning collaboratively to change frontline practices

Meeting Abstract

  • L. Cockburn - Department of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Socio-Economic Empowerment of Persons With Disabilities (SEEPD), Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board, Bamenda, North West Region, Cameroon; International Centre For Disability and Rehabilitation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  • J. Wango - Bamenda Coordinating Centre For Studies In Disability and Rehabilitation, Bamenda, North West Region, Cameroon
  • E. Anjonga - Bamenda Coordinating Centre For Studies In Disability and Rehabilitation, Bamenda, North West Region, Cameroon
  • M. Nicholas - Bamenda Coordinating Centre For Studies In Disability and Rehabilitation, Bamenda, North West Region, Cameroon
  • E. Benuh - Socio-Economic Empowerment of Persons With Disabilities (SEEPD), Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board, Bamenda, North West Region, Cameroon
  • K. Chow - International Centre For Disability and Rehabilitation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  • S. Kiani - International Centre For Disability and Rehabilitation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  • A. Bramall - Student, Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

Guidelines International Network. G-I-N Conference 2012. Berlin, 22.-25.08.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. DocP063

DOI: 10.3205/12gin175, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12gin1750

Published: July 10, 2012

© 2012 Cockburn et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Purpose or Research Hypothesis: We present our learning from a multi-year Best Practices in Rehabilitation (BPR) project in Cameroon.

Relevance and context: Little work has been done on BPR in Africa. We describe several project phases including planning appropriate processes and establishing project goals, carrying out guideline development, and project evaluation.

Results, Findings, Description of Best practices: A participatory process was used to develop the project activities. Strategies to increase collaboration were used: recruiting local and international participants, meetings, working group processes, emails, and internet groups. Several guidelines have been developed.

Lessons and Conclusions: Successes – Revised processes have been developed. In-depth workshops improved levels of enthusiasm. Difficulties – Recruiting international members familiar with the specific context and with time to devote to the project. More adaptation and evaluation are required to develop effective guidelines in contexts with limited rehabilitation systems. Strategies developed in this project may be useful for others.