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7th EFSMA – European Congress of Sports Medicine, 3rd Central European Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Annual Assembly of the German and the Austrian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Austrian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

26.-29.10.2011, Salzburg, Austria

Prevention of sports injuries including neuromuscular training

Meeting Abstract

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  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Winfried Banzer - Department of Sports Medicine, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany
  • author Markus Hübscher - Department of Sports Medicine, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

7th EFSMA – European Congress of Sports Medicine, 3rd Central European Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Salzburg, 26.-29.10.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2011. Doc11esm013

DOI: 10.3205/11esm013, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11esm0138

Published: October 24, 2011

© 2011 Banzer et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Sports and recreation injuries constitute a major public health burden. The most common sports injuries are sprains, dislocations, and ligament ruptures occurring at the ankle and knee as well as at the hand, elbow, and shoulder. Particularly, severe injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures or ankle sprains are often associated with increased morbidity (e.g. early development of joint osteoarthritis) and long-term disability. Therefore, measures to prevent and treat these injuries are of particular interest. On the basis of previous research, it is hypothesized that proprioceptive and neuromuscular abilities in particular have a certain impact on injury risk. Furthermore, sport-related joint injuries tend to result in severe and long-term alterations in proprioceptive and neuromuscular functions that can further increase the risk of persisting functional deficits and recurrent injury. Exercise-based prevention programs are thus based on the assumption that modifying proprioception and neuromuscular risk factors might help to decrease injury risk. The aim of my presentation will be first to review the current evidence on specific exercise programs aimed at improving proprioception and neuromuscular function to reduce the incidence of acute sports injuries (e.g. [1]). Furthermore, I will review the effectiveness of neuromuscular rehabilitation programs to prevent injury recurrence (e.g. [2]). The evidence demonstrates that neuromuscular training can reduce the risk of knee and ankle injuries during pivoting sports by at least 32%. There is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions on the effectiveness of interventions used to prevent hamstring, groin or upper extremity injuries. Concerning secondary prevention, it can be concluded that neuromuscular interventions can be effective for the prevention of recurrent ankle sprains.


References

1.
Hübscher M, Zech A, Pfeifer K, Hänsel F, Vogt L, Banzer W. Neuromuscular training for sports injury prevention: a systematic review. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2010;42(3):413-21.
2.
Zech A, Hübscher M, Vogt L, Banzer W, Hänsel F, Pfeifer K. Neuromuscular training for rehabilitation of sports injuries. A systematic review. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009;41(10):1831-41.