gms | German Medical Science

Deutscher Kongress für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie (DKOU 2012)

23.10. - 26.10.2012, Berlin

Validierung eines Robotersystems zur Erforschung passiver gleno-humeraler Kinematik

Meeting Abstract

  • presenting/speaker Claudio Rosso - Universitätsspital Basel, Universität Basel, Orthopädische Klinik, Basel, Switzerland
  • Andreas Marc Müller - Universitätsspital Basel, Universität Basel, Orthopädische Klinik, Basel, Switzerland
  • Andrea Cereatti - Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari Medical School, Sassari, Italy
  • Victor Valderrabano - Universitätsspital Basel, Universität Basel, Orthopädische Klinik, Basel, Switzerland
  • Joseph P. DeAngelis - Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, United States
  • Arun J. Ramappa - Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, United States
  • Ara Nazarian - Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies, Boston, United States
  • Ugo Della Croce - Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari Medical School, Sassari, Italy

Deutscher Kongress für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie (DKOU 2012). Berlin, 23.-26.10.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. DocPO11-959

DOI: 10.3205/12dkou516, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12dkou5163

Published: October 2, 2012

© 2012 Rosso et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Objective: The glenohumeral (GH) joint has the greatest range of motion in the human body but little intrinsic stability, thereby increasing its susceptibility to excessive translations and injury. Current models used to study shoulder kinematics are limited because they isolate the GH joint, implement dynamic motion patterns with low reproducibility, and track motions discontinuously or with limited accuracy. To overcome these limitations, we have designed a novel system in which the entire shoulder girdle is studied using highly reproducible trajectories created by a robotic actuator to control a full cadaveric torso.

Methods: High-speed cameras track bone markers and calibrated anatomical scapular landmarks for continuous registration of the center of the GH joint. In this study, we valuated the system`s capacity to capture reproducibly GH translations in intact and pathologic shoulder conditions. We subjected a left and a right shoulder of two anthropometrically different cadaveric torsos to three sequential trials of humeral elevation prior to and after the implementation and restoration of scapular winging as well as a full thickness supraspinatus tear.

Results and conclusions: The system was consistently capable of detecting differences in GH translations as small as 0.5 mm between the intact, altered, and restored shoulder presentations. For each condition, three trials were performed. The registration of GH translations was highly reproducible with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) of 0.77 to 0.99 (P<0.001) and standard deviations (SD) of 0.16 mm to 0.64 mm. These data illustrate the systems high validity in describing GH kinematics.

With this system we will be able to study complex shoulder joint kinematics using a whole torso and thus no impairing the adjacent joints.