gms | German Medical Science

Deutscher Kongress für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie
74. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie
96. Tagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Orthopädie und Orthopädische Chirurgie
51. Tagung des Berufsverbandes der Fachärzte für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie

26. - 29.10.2010, Berlin

Computer aided three dimensional anthropometry of the scaphoid

Meeting Abstract

  • N. Heidari - Colchester General Hospital, Colchester, United Kingdom
  • W. Pichler - Univ. Klinik für Unfallchirurgie, Medizinische Universität Graz, Austria
  • G. Windisch - Institut für Anatomie, Medizinische Universität Graz, Austria
  • T.A. Schildhauer - Univ. Klinik für Unfallchirurgie, Medizinische Universität Graz, Austria

Deutscher Kongress für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie. 74. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie, 96. Tagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Orthopädie und Orthopädische Chirurgie, 51. Tagung des Berufsverbandes der Fachärzte für Orthopädie. Berlin, 26.-29.10.2010. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2010. DocIN17-656

DOI: 10.3205/10dkou106, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-10dkou1067

Published: October 21, 2010

© 2010 Heidari et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Objective: Scaphoid fracture fixation using cannulated headless compression screw and the Matti-Russe procedure for the treatment of scaphoid non-unions are performed routinely. Surgeons performing these procedures need to be familiar with the anatomy of the scaphoid. A literature review reveals relatively few articles on this subject. Aim of this anatomical study was to measure the scaphoid using an up to date technology and to discuss the findings with respect to the current, relevant literature.

Methods: Computed tomography scans of 30 wrists were performed by using a 64-slice Siemens SOMATOM Sensation® CT system (resolution 0.6 mm). Three dimensional reconstructions from the raw data were generated by MIMICS® software. This software was used for all measurements.

Results and conclusions: The scaphoid has a mean length of 26.0 mm (22.3–30.7mm), men have a significantly longer (p<0.001) scaphoid than women (men: 27.8 mm±1.6 mm, women: 24.5 mm ±1.6 mm). The width and height were measured at three different levels for volume calculations, resulting in a mean volume of 3,389.5 mm3. The male scaphoid has a significantly larger (p<0.001) volume (men: 4,057.8 mm3±740.7mm3, women: 2,846.5 mm3±617.5mm3).

We found considerable variation in the length and volume of the scaphoid in our cohort. We have also demonstrated a clear correlation between scaphoid size and gender. Surgeons performing operative fixation of scaphoid fractures and corticocalcellous bone grafting for non-unions need to be familiar with these anatomical variations.