gms | German Medical Science

49. Jahrestagung der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Plastische, Ästhetische und Rekonstruktive Chirurgie (ÖGPÄRC), 42. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft der Plastischen, Rekonstruktiven und Ästhetischen Chirurgen e. V. (DGPRÄC), 16. Jahrestagung der Vereinigung der Deutschen Ästhetisch-Plastischen Chirurgen e. V. (VDÄPC)

29.09. - 01.10.2011, Innsbruck

Cigarette smoke extract affects the differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stromal cells

Meeting Abstract

  • author Tilo Schenck - Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • Judith Selders - Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • Ursula Hopfner - Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • Ann K. Reckhenrich - Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • Manuela Kirsch - Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • Ziyang Zhang - Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • Hans-Günther Machens - Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • J. Tomás Egaña - Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany

Österreichische Gesellschaft für Plastische, Ästhetische und Rekonstruktive Chirurgie. Deutsche Gesellschaft der Plastischen, Rekonstruktiven und Ästhetischen Chirurgen. Vereinigung der Deutschen Ästhetisch-Plastischen Chirurgen. 49. Jahrestagung der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Plastische, Ästhetische und Rekonstruktive Chirurgie (ÖGPÄRC), 42. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft der Plastischen, Rekonstruktiven und Ästhetischen Chirurgen (DGPRÄC), 16. Jahrestagung der Vereinigung der Deutschen Ästhetisch-Plastischen Chirurgen (VDÄPC). Innsbruck, 29.09.-01.10.2011. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2011. Doc11dgpraecV56

DOI: 10.3205/11dgpraec057, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-11dgpraec0574

Published: September 27, 2011

© 2011 Schenck et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

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Introduction: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are known to play a key role in tissue regeneration, while cigarette smoking is described to impair it. Such problem causes a tremendous problem in clinical care. The work presented here addresses the question of how cigarette smoke affects the regeneration potential of MSC.

Materials and methods: MSC were isolated from human fat tissue of healthy donors who gave informed consent. Afterwards, MSC were cultured and exposed to different concentrations of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and it effects on viability and metabolic activity were evaluated. Additionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured under different concentrations. Effects of 0.5% CSE on cell migration capacity were evaluated by a scratch assay. Next, MSC were exposed to 0.5% CSE and their differentiation potential was analyzed.

Results: Exposure of MSC to high concentrations of CSE resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability (p < 0.05) and increase of ROS (p < 0.05). In contrast low concentrations (0.5%) of CSE did not affect cell viability neither metabolic activity but resulted in decreased migration activity (p < 0.05). Here we have also found that pretreatment of MSC with sub lethal concentrations of CSE decreases adipogenic differentiation (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Our results describe for first time a direct effect of cigarette smoke in the functionality and viability of human stem cells in vitro. Our results might partially explain the decrease in the regenerative potential of smokers. In addition, it is possible to speculate that decrease in adipogenic differentiation might be partially responsible for the weight gain after smoking. Although our results are interesting, further studies have to be performed to evaluate the functional effect of cigarette smoke in MSC in vivo.