gms | German Medical Science

63rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Neurosurgery (DGNC)
Joint Meeting with the Japanese Neurosurgical Society (JNS)

German Society of Neurosurgery (DGNC)

13 - 16 June 2012, Leipzig

Focal lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum on MR image following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

Meeting Abstract

  • K. Yoshida - Department of Neurosurgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan
  • N. Horie - Department of Neurosurgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan
  • S. Ishizaka - Department of Neurosurgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan
  • T. Takeshita - Department of Neurosurgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan
  • K. Hayashi - Department of Neurosurgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan
  • K. Suyama - Department of Neurosurgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan
  • I. Nagata - Department of Neurosurgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Japanische Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 63. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC), Joint Meeting mit der Japanischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (JNS). Leipzig, 13.-16.06.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. DocP 068

DOI: 10.3205/12dgnc455, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12dgnc4555

Published: June 4, 2012

© 2012 Yoshida et al.
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Outline

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Objective: Recently, some reports have been shown abnormal findings in the splenium of the corpus callosum in the setting of the central nervous system diseases. However, its mechanism is still undetermined. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed such lesions following aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and discuss its clinical implications.

Methods: Twenty-nine consecutive cases of SAH were included. Imaging analysis was performed with MR diffusion weighted image (DWI), MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery image (FLAIR) and CT on the sub-acute stage (around Day 7) following SAH. Patient characteristics including age, sex, Hunt and Kosnik grade, aneurysm location, treatment, and SAH clearance were compared between the cases with and without abnormal lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum.

Results: Five cases (17.2%) showed abnormal findings in the splenium without neurological symptoms. These lesions showed high signal intensity on DWI and FLAIR suggesting focal ischemia. One case showed hemorrhagic changes in the lesion. There was no significant difference in patient characteristics and angiographical vasospasm in the anterior circulation. Interestingly, initial SAH around the perimescencephalic cistern on CT (49.5±9.0 HU vs. 37.4±14.4 HU) was significantly higher and SAH clearance on Day 7 (31.1±11.5 HU vs. 22.9±10.5 HU) was poorer in the case with splenium lesion.

Conclusions: Ischemic lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum is not rare following SAH, and vasospasm in this area could contribute to this abnormal findings. This finding will be noted with increasing frequency.