gms | German Medical Science

63rd Annual Meeting of the German Society of Neurosurgery (DGNC)
Joint Meeting with the Japanese Neurosurgical Society (JNS)

German Society of Neurosurgery (DGNC)

13 - 16 June 2012, Leipzig

Short psychological intervention as a perioperative pain reduction treatment in spinal neurosurgery

Meeting Abstract

  • R. Reichart - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Jena
  • I. Vogel - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Jena
  • T. Weiss - Institut für Biologische und Klinische Psychologie, Universitätsklinikum Jena
  • S. Hennig - Institut für Biologische und Klinische Psychologie, Universitätsklinikum Jena
  • J. Walter - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Jena
  • R. Kalff - Klinik und Poliklinik für Neurochirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Jena

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. Japanische Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 63. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC), Joint Meeting mit der Japanischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (JNS). Leipzig, 13.-16.06.2012. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2012. DocDO.08.01

DOI: 10.3205/12dgnc067, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-12dgnc0677

Published: June 4, 2012

© 2012 Reichart et al.
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Outline

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Objective: The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of an innovative Short Psychological Intervention (SPI) for back pain patients as part of an acute inpatient neurosurgical treatment. Fear and fear-avoidance beliefs have been shown to influence the functional outcome in chronic back pain (CBP) patients. Therefore, a reduction of fear and fear-avoidance beliefs should improve the functional outcome and reduce pain in the acute neurosurgical setting.

Methods: 39 patients were studied in a randomized prospective longitudinal study. The patients had severe degenerative spinal disease and had undergone posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

Results: All patients enrolled in the study were investigated in the immediate preoperative period and 6 weeks postoperatively using a package of standardized questionnaires in which pain intensity, fear-avoidance beliefs, and physical fitness were recorded. In 19 of the patients, the surgical procedure was supplemented by a SPI based on methods to increase self-efficacy by reducing fear-avoidance beliefs. The intervention group reported a significantly greater reduction in the highest pain intensity and a better physical fitness compared to the control group.

Conclusions: The study confirmed that psychological interventions could offer significant benefits when used in the acute inpatient setting as the outcome of surgery can be positively influenced. Future studies should focus on cost savings related to improved postoperative recovery and a possible reduction of chronic postoperative pain.