gms | German Medical Science

60th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Neurosurgery (DGNC)
Joint Meeting with the Benelux countries and Bulgaria

German Society of Neurosurgery (DGNC)

24 - 27 May 2009, Münster

Quality of Life according to SF-36 and overall outcome after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage in a large, retrospective single-center study

Meeting Abstract

  • K. Beseoglu - Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum der Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
  • S. Pannes - Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum der Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
  • H.-J. Steiger - Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum der Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
  • D. Hänggi - Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum der Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie. 60. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC), Joint Meeting mit den Benelux-Ländern und Bulgarien. Münster, 24.-27.05.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. DocP13-06

DOI: 10.3205/09dgnc392, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09dgnc3926

Published: May 20, 2009

© 2009 Beseoglu et al.
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Outline

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Objective: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating incident which requires early diagnosis and therapy as well as extensive neurorehabilitation in the follow-up course. Even if no apparent focal neurological deficit remains, the quality of life as experienced by the patients varies significantly. In this large analysis we evaluated quality of life using the established SF-36 questionnaire along with basic neurologic outcome, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) and dependence on care as represented by the Barthel-Index.

Methods: In this analysis we were able to include 125 patients (77 female, 46 male) treated in our department between 2003 and 2007 that had completely filled out the SF-36 questionnaire. Mean age of the patient population was 51.2 years (16 to 80 years).

The recorded data comprised initial neurological status, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), and World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grading as well as neurological status at the time of discharge according to GCS. The SF-36 form, a Barthel-Index and a short custom-made neurological questionnaire were answered by the patients in September and October 2008. Mean follow-up time was 30.6 months (14 to 68 months).

Results: Overall outcome concerning focal neurological deficit was good. Minor deficits were only described in few patients (11/125, 9%), and most patients were able to return to work. A Barthel-Index ≥95 was reached by 86% of all patients with 92% achieving a GOS ≥4. In contrast the individual quality of life (SF-36) differed widely among all examined patients. Physical functioning, role-physical, and general health were scaled as significantly reduced compared to normal population. Mental health, social functioning, role-emotional and vitality were graduated as moderately reduced in comparison to the normal population. Only bodily pain does not differ from the normal population.

Conclusions: Neurological deficits predominantly disable patients after aneurysmal SAH. However, even in case of absence of a neurological deficit the quality of life as experienced by the individual after SAH was demonstrated to be significantly reduced in comparison to the normal population.