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126. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie

28.04. - 01.05.2009, München

Mechanical complication with Broviac® repair kit in a 4-year old boy with MEN 2a

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  • corresponding author S. Sesia - Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Children’s Hospital Basle (UKBB), Basle, Switzerland
  • F.M. Häcker - Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Children’s Hospital Basle (UKBB), Basle, Switzerland
  • J. Mayr - Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Children’s Hospital Basle (UKBB), Basle, Switzerland

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. 126. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie. München, 28.04.-01.05.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. Doc09dgch11478

DOI: 10.3205/09dgch365, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09dgch3651

Published: April 23, 2009

© 2009 Sesia et al.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en). You are free: to Share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work, provided the original author and source are credited.


Outline

Text

Introduction: Possible mechanical complications in the practice of indwelling central venous catheter (CVC) such as Broviac® catheter (BC) are bending, occlusion, dislocation or leak. We report on a mechanical complication after using a repair kit for BC.

Material und methods: A 4-year old boy, with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2a (MEN-2a), intestinal aganglionosis (Hirschsprung’s disease) and short bowel syndrome, necessitates BC for home parenteral nutrition.

Results: Due to recurrent leakage of the BC, 5 subsequent repairs were necessary within seven months. During one repair we noticed that, a metallic tube (MT) belonging to the repair kit migrated proximally to the skin entrance level within the BC and required surgical removal.

Conclusion: To our knowledge this is the first report focusing on such a serious complication using a BC. The proximal migration of this MT represents a theoretical risk of endothoracic foreign body embolisation.

Figure 1 [Fig. 1]