gms | German Medical Science

International Conference on SARS - one year after the (first) outbreak

08. - 11.05.2004, Lübeck

Limited variation in SARS coronavirus S and N protein genes observed by direct sequencing from patient’s original clinical specimens

Talk

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Suxiang Tong - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Jairam R. Lingappa - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Qi Chen - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Bo Shu - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Ashley C. Lamonte - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Byron T. Cook - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Charryse Birge - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Shur-wern Wang Chern - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Xin Liu - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Renee Galloway - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Le Quynh Mai - Department of Virology National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Vietnam
  • Wai Fu Ng - NTS Pathology Services, Princess Margaret Hospital and Yan Chai Hospital, Hong Kong
  • Jyh-Yuan Yang - CDC, Taiwan
  • Jagdish Butany - University of Toronto University Health Network/Toronto Medical Laboratories Toronto general Hospital, Toronto, Canada
  • James A. Comer - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Stephan S. Monroe - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • R. Suzanne Beard - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Thomas G. Ksiazek - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Dean Erdman - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Paul A. Rota - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Mark A Pallansch - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Larry J. Anderson - National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

International Conference on SARS - one year after the (first) outbreak. Lübeck, 08.-11.05.2004. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2004. Doc04sars6.07

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/sars2004/04sars031.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 26. Mai 2004

© 2004 Tong et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged in November 2002 as a novel agent causing severe respiratory illness. To study sequence variation in the SARS-CoV genome, we determined the nucleic acid sequence of the S and N genes directly from clinical specimens of 10 patients. These include a single specimen with no corresponding isolate from two of these patients, multiple specimens from three of these patients, as well as matched cell culture isolates from six of these patients. We identified three nucleotide substitutions that were most likely due to natural variation and two substitutions that arose following cell culture passage of the virus. These data demonstrate the overall stability of the S and N genes of SARS-CoV over 3 months of time and a minimum of four generations for transmission events. These findings are a part of the expanding investigation into the evolution of this virus adapting to a new host.