gms | German Medical Science

Research in Medical Education – Chances and Challenges International Conference

20.05. - 22.05.2009, Heidelberg

Cross-year on ward peer tutoring program: Benefits for the students on ward and for the tutors when starting their job as physician 1½ years after

Meeting Abstract

  • corresponding author presenting/speaker Nadja Köhl-Hackert - University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany
  • author Sven Andreesen - University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany
  • author Katja Hoffmann - University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany
  • author Jana Jünger - University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany
  • author Christoph Nikendei - University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany

Research in Medical Education - Chances and Challenges 2009. Heidelberg, 20.-22.05.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. Doc09rmeB2

DOI: 10.3205/09rme07, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09rme071

Veröffentlicht: 5. Mai 2009

© 2009 Köhl-Hackert et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Abstract

Question: Peer-assisted learning is a common and effective method in medical education for both: learners and peer-tutors. In summer 2007 a PAL-program was introduced at the University of Heidelberg Medical Hospital, Germany, to improve the clinical technical skills on ward. The aim of this controlled trial was to assess the effects of a cross-year on ward peer tutoring program on

1.
the students: how they rated their ward emplacement and
2.
the tutors: how they feel to benefit when they start their work as physician.

Method: 168 medical students currently in their third year were included in the study. 88 of them were assigned to the intervention group (IG) and took part in 10 student-led tutorials. The remaining 80 students were assigned to the control group (CG) and did not receive any tutorials during their ward emplacement. Tutorials were led by 14 volunteer final year student tutors who assessed the program after 1½ years after having been a tutor.

Results: Students who took part in the PAL-program (IG) spent significantly more time with a final year student than those from the CG (p<0,001), whereas the IG spent less time with the physicians on ward (p<0,008).

Furthermore the IG felt significantly more integrated on ward (p<0,001) and significantly less anxiety concerning on-ward work as a medical doctor (p<0,001) than the CG. Results of the questionnaire of the tutors after 1½ years will be presented.

Conclusions: As expected, the IG was more often taught by final year students within the PAL-program than the CG and spent significantly less time with the physicians on ward. Having a PAL-program the students felt better integrated on ward and less anxious concerning on-ward work. While peer tutors are no substitute for teaching by a qualified physician and the contact between students and physicians on ward is important, the on ward PAL-program is a particularly valuable tool in supporting medical students.

Results of the tutor questionnaire after 1½ years will be discussed.