gms | German Medical Science

48th Meeting of the Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group

Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group (PTCOG)

28.09. - 03.10.2009, Heidelberg

Development of Si/CdTe Compton Camera for Medical Imaging

Meeting Abstract

  • H. Shimada - Heavy Ion Medical Research Center, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan
  • M. Yamaguchi - Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma, Japan
  • N. Kawachi - Quantum Beam Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki Gunma, Japan
  • K. Torikai - Heavy Ion Medical Research Center, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan
  • S. Watanabe - Quantum Beam Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki Gunma, Japan
  • H. Aono - Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan
  • H. Odaka - Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan
  • S. Ishikawa - Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan
  • S. Takeda - Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan
  • S. Watanabe - Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan
  • Y. Yoshida - Heavy Ion Medical Research Center, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan
  • Y. Suzuki - Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan
  • T. Takahashi - Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan
  • K. Arakawa - Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma, Japan
  • T. Nakano - Heavy Ion Medical Research Center, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan

PTCOG 48. Meeting of the Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group. Heidelberg, 28.09.-03.10.2009. Düsseldorf: German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; 2009. Doc09ptcog183

DOI: 10.3205/09ptcog183, URN: urn:nbn:de:0183-09ptcog1832

Veröffentlicht: 24. September 2009

© 2009 Shimada et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

The Compton camera is a next-generation in vivo imaging system and a successor to the positron emission tomography (PET) and the single photon emission computedtomography (SPECT) systems. By using the concept of Compton imaging, simultaneous multi-element imaging, wide range RI imaging, and high spatial resolution will be achieved. These capabilities will be applied for, not only the astronomyand the homeland security, but also for medical imaging.

We have developed a prototype of Compton camera using for in vivo imaging by Si/CdTe semiconductors for medical imaging devices, which has been proved to be successful techniques for the observation of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. In this camera, doublesided Si strip detectors (DSSDs) serve as scatterers and pixelized CdTe detectors (pCdTe) serve as absorbers. In a Compton camera, employing the imaging semiconductors as the component of the Compton camera, with their good energy and position resolution, improves angular resolution and hence sensitivity. Moreover, for the supposed energy range of gamma rays, from several tens keV to a few MeV, silicon is suitable for the scatter of Compton camera since the photo absorption cross section of Si is small and the Compton cross-section is relatively large because of the small atomic number. On the other hand, CdTe is suitable for the absorbers because of its high photo-absorption efficiency for gamma rays of this energy region, due to the large atomic numbers. In this study, we will summarize the basic principle and performance of the Si/CdTe Compton camera for medical imaging. In a rat study, the nuclides in the body were distinguished by their gamma-ray energies, and the difference in the distributions of the nuclides could also be successfully observed.