gms | German Medical Science

Physical activity and successful aging
10th International EGREPA Conference

European Group for Research into Elderly and Physical Activity

14.09. - 16.09.2006 in Köln

Influence of aging and physical exercise on the rate of hydrogen peroxide production 'in vivo' in the rat skeletal muscle

Meeting Abstract

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  • corresponding author F. Sacks Campos - University of Porto, Portugal
  • J.A. Duarte - University of Porto, Portugal

Physical activity and successful aging. Xth International EGREPA Conference. Cologne, 14.-16.09.2006. Düsseldorf, Köln: German Medical Science; 2006. Doc06pasa087

Die elektronische Version dieses Artikels ist vollständig und ist verfügbar unter: http://www.egms.de/de/meetings/pasa2006/06pasa087.shtml

Veröffentlicht: 18. Dezember 2006

© 2006 Sacks Campos et al.
Dieser Artikel ist ein Open Access-Artikel und steht unter den Creative Commons Lizenzbedingungen (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.de). Er darf vervielf&aauml;ltigt, verbreitet und &oauml;ffentlich zug&aauml;nglich gemacht werden, vorausgesetzt dass Autor und Quelle genannt werden.


Gliederung

Text

Reactive oxygen species are continuous generated in the biological system and play an important role in a variety of physiological and pathological process. Several lines of evidence suggest that accumulation of oxidative molecular damage is a causal factor in senescence. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of aging and physical exercise on the rate of hydrogen peroxide production in the soleus muscle. The sample consisted of 50 male Charles River rats, where 25 rats were younger (4 – 5 weeks old) and 25 rats older (more than 18 months old), and was divided into 4 groups according to age (younger vs. older) and physical activity (sedentary control vs. exercised trained). The exercise protocol was established by a swimming training supporting load of 2% of the body weight. The animals were killed by cervical dislocation at zero, 15 and 30 minutes after the intra-peritoneal injection of aminotriazole, and the soleus muscles were removed. To measure the “in vivo” hydrogen peroxide in this muscle, the methodology of quantifying residual catalase activity was used. The results suggest that: (i) at zero minutes of the experimental protocol, the residual catalase activity is higher in the old group, probably due to the proteic synthesis induction of this enzyme modulated by the higher hydrogen peroxide production (27,32 ± 2,360, P<0,004); (ii) the old sedentary group showed a higher rate of decrease in the residual catalase activity during the experimental protocol, suggesting a higher hydrogen peroxide production (42,92 ± 5,19, p<0,001); (iii) during the exercise protocol both exercise trained groups showed a decrease in the residual catalase activity, suggesting a higher rate of hydrogen peroxide production with muscle contraction (28,63 ± 6,56 vs. 50,30 ± 9,44, p<0,001) ; (iv) during the exercise protocol the old group showed a higher decrease in residual catalase activity, suggesting a higher rate of hydrogen peroxide production to the same intensity of exercise (28,63 ± 6,56, p<0,001). In general the results suggest that age and physical exercise are conditioning factors on the rate of hydrogen peroxide production in rat skeletal muscle.